Invisible Illness
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Invisible Illness

A Soldier and His Civilian: Being Married to a Combat Veteran with PTSD

Image by JUrban at Pixabay

It’s the Fourth of July, and the whole city sounds like war. In my husband’s head, it is war all over again, battles he thought he left behind in the Iraqi desert years before I met him.

Inside, our home is no retreat. Nothing drowns out the thunder of gunfire and imminent death. Chances are, my husband and best friend isn’t coming back from…

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We don't talk enough about mental health.

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Sarah Sharp

Sarah Sharp

Sarah Sharp writes about mental health and social injustice. You can find more of her work at soldiers-wives.com and www.sarahsharp.us.

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