Social Media Oversharing Proves How Badly We Need Therapy

Or at the very least, stronger social connections.

Renata Ellera Gomes
Invisible Illness
Published in
7 min readMay 16, 2024

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Photo by Taan Huyn on Unsplash

A young couple in their mid-twenties shares a long hug. They’re standing in front of a pile of cardboard boxes, and the young man cries as he holds the young woman against his chest. By the looks of it, at least one of them is moving out. They break their embrace for a few seconds, just long enough for the young woman to smile at her partner and gently reach out her hands to wipe away his tears with the tips of her thumbs.

I could be witnessing the scene from across the room. I could be a kind friend who found herself in an awkward position while helping the couple move, but I’m watching them from the other side of a screen, along with at least 1.4 million others. This isn’t a dramatization. This isn’t television. This is a moment in this young couple’s lives that they decided to record and share on social media. The caption to the video reads “Our final goodbye… true love is helping me move into my new place,” broken heart emoji, #breakuptiktok.

It feels callous to describe a scene like that in writing. The video was posted on the young woman’s TikTok account, which leads me to believe she was the one who propped the phone up on a shelf and made sure her boyfriend hit his marks so she could catch it all in the…

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Renata Ellera Gomes
Invisible Illness

Writing about love, relationships, culture, and life in general. Get my book, Acid Sugar, at shorturl.at/hvAVX