35: Duck Analogies

Weird animals and self-driving trucks.

Hello internet friends,

this email is going to be quite a task today. Most bookmarks I collected during the week are MacBook-related and honestly, it’s a bit too depressing to link to those now. Here’s one with all the links to all the articles, so… go nuts. And then there’s this one, which at least made me laugh.
And if this article is true (ugh, I do link to these articles now, do I? Sorry.) I’ll be one unhappy person in the future. If someone told me that I had to get rid of all my digital things except for one, I’d not even have to think too much to keep my current MBP.

Ugh. Kinda boring to think about these things, isn’t it, though?

I am pretty sure this dude does not think much about computers — all he wants to do is be Indiana Jones and solve the mystery of that Malaysian airplane that vanished.

Important dinosaur news! Not only did they have feathers — we can all agree on that — they also quacked and cooed. And we all know the duck test — if it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.

Well — if it looks like a truck and drives like a truck, it might actually be a truck. And pretty soon these things will drive by themselves. Either in a very serious way or just for a beer run.
Which is always a good way to get technology working. Maybe the pursuit of getting drunk faster might have been the driving force behind new technologies? Or maybe it was just good old competition.

Scientists often use camera traps to study wildlife — motion-activated cameras can be great to take photos of elusive animals that might be hidden from human photographers. Sometimes these animals are really strange, though.

And then there’s the giraffe.

Toodles!


This is an archived version of the email I sent to my internet friends on October 31st, 2016. If you want to be my internet friend and receive these emails, you can do so on irregularity.co.



Originally published at irregularity.co.

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