A Kindle kind of life

Isobar Australia
Sep 18, 2017 · 6 min read
Illustration by Augusto Jacquier
Dr. Christopher Duma uses VR prior to brain surgery.

Walking loose

If you go to Zero Latency, in North Melbourne, you might find yourself at odds with what’s on display: a huge, empty warehouse, nothing but black walls and concrete floors, framed by a network of cameras. In the middle, a group of people, each strapped to a VR headset and armed with a two-handed gun, walk around in apparent disarray. They talk to each other, and yell, and laugh, and unless you’re experiencing what they are, act in a manner that seems to make no sense. For outsiders, it likely reads as an episode from Black Mirror.

Free-roaming players likely shooting zombies at Zero Latency.

The Kindle of reality

In 2007, after a decade of other companies’ failed attempts at making e-books “a thing”, Amazon launched their Kindle e-reader to tepid reviews and skeptical appraisals. Today, ten years later, many consider paper books a romantic notion, much like vinyl records. Kindles didn’t kill the book the same way video didn’t kill cinema: they just offered people a different vehicle to access and consume the same content.

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We’re Isobar Australia, a leading digital agency transforming brands, businesses and people’s lives through the creative use of digital.

Isobar Australia Blog

We're Isobar Australia, a leading digital agency transforming brands, businesses and people's lives through the creative use of digital.