JavaScript Weekend List #10

This week I had a chance to dive deeper into GraphQL. I discovered some new tools and now I’m convinced GraphQL is the new way to build APIs. My goal is to prototype few APIs in the next few weeks.

In the past 2–3 months I was researching a lot about “the best API framework, doesn’t have to be JavaScript”. After reading more about Go, Python, Java and other languages I now realize GraphQL is the way to go. I am not saying it’s the best for every single project, but I chose to use it for my projects. I’ll report back how it goes.

Here are some interesting projects and articles for the past week:


1. Announcing Gatsby 1.0

Gatsby is your friendly, blazing fast static site generator for React. And after nearly a year of research, prototyping, and testing, Gatsby v1 is ready for action.


2. Your First Service Worker

A service worker is a simple javascript script that your browser runs in the background. It runs on a different thread to the main JavaScript that powers your web app. It’s async and no blocking, without any DOM access. Quick and easy to follow tutorial.


3. Bullet proof your technology stack with GraphQL

A blog post from my friend John J Masse. As I mentioned in the past — GraphQL is becoming a new standard when it comes to building APIs. The author knows a thing or two about implementing GraphQL in the very large scale projects. Worth the read!


4. A beginner’s guide to making Progressive Web Apps

Hopefully, this post will be all you need to get started in making your own PWA.


5. Mastering Chrome Developer Tools: Next Level Front-End Development Techniques

You may already be familiar with the basic features of the Chrome Developer Tools: the DOM inspector, styles panel, and JavaScript console. But there are a number of lesser-known features that can dramatically improve your debugging or app creation workflows.

6. GraphQL-Europe 2017 Videos


7. Building a realtime feed with Node.js and AMP

On mobile devices, web pages can take several seconds to load. However, AMPs are web pages designed to load near instantaneously due to the limited set of allowed functionality they provide and a distribution system built around caching.


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