UX — Inputs

Juan Pacheco
Nov 26, 2020 · 3 min read

I usually like to work with at least these three UX inputs in a project, so far this approach was enough fair to start with, but at the same time in some other projects the needed of more inputs was an addition value in the success chain. Anyways, if you start with these three, you’re in the right way.

Image for post
Image for post

Business objectives

A fundamental input in the UX design process is a solid understanding of the underlying business objectives.

  • What are you trying to accomplish?
  • Do you want to sell products or services?
  • Are you improving a process?
  • There’s an issue in current digital channels impacting customers convertions?
  • Provide customer information to reduce phone calls?
  • Engage and entertain users?
  • A clear definition of the business goals and objectives is the first and most critical step.
  • Want to improve the transformation process from visitor to a fan?

After you define these objectives, you also have to determine how you will measure success.

In addition, though, you consider other operational business objectives, which may be also important.

  • How will the experience be maintained?
  • Who will update the content?
  • Who will define the content strategy in future?
  • How will the experience be modified and enhanced over time?

Competitive landscape

In many of the projects I’ve worked, was pretty important to consider the competitive landscape:

  • Who else possesses a similar product or service that is on the market? is there something similar?
  • Has he built a user experience to promote, sell, or support his product or service?
  • How mature is that UX?
  • What can you learn from assessing the UX of that service?
  • What do you like?
  • What features or content may be missing?
  • Is any specific feature you considered as an differentiator?

Assessing your competition means that you assess what others in the same industry are doing, especially around any types of user interaction they create.

Given the iterative nature of digital design, where websites and applications are continually updated and enhanced, it’s particularly useful to take a deep look at any similar experiences (products or services) that exist on the market.

You can learn a lot from quickly assessing these services, and avoid many of the UX pitfalls that are common in design today.

Technology architecture

This input includes which technology is necessary to support the solution you are building.

  • Which technology is necessary to create, produce, publish, and maintain your user experience?
  • Where will the user experience exist (for instance, a website on mobile, tablet, and desktop)?
  • What technology will support you solution?
  • What’s customer current technology architecture? (As-Is)
  • What will be future customer technology architecture? (To-Be)
  • Is there any specific consideration about Technoogy Stack to take in care?

Taking time to assess the underlying technology architecture will ensure that the design choices you make throughout the process will be supported by the underlying technology.

Assuming we’re working in a digital product, some of the more simple technology questions that need to be addressed are:

  • Which web browsers will be supported?
  • Will the solution be used via mobile devices, and if so, which operating systems will be supported (Apple, Android, and so forth)?
  • Any specific device or device feature to be considered?

If you are designing an e-commerce or more complex solution, you need to explore additional areas, including:

  • Is there a system to publish and manage content, such as a content management system?
  • If you are selling products, how will the product catalog be updated and maintained?
  • How will you process payments?
  • Will the website or app require a user to register or authenticate herself?

These topics can get very technical, very quickly, so it is critical for all team members on a UX project to have a common understanding of the technologies that will enable the experience.

They play a critical role in the eventual experience.

Image for post
Image for post
https://iamjuan.me/paypal

juanpacheco

Design Thinking coach and Senior UX Designer

Juan Pacheco

Written by

LATAM BDM (Business Development Manager) @ TCS Interactive | Design Thinking coach and Senior UX Designer, NLP practitioner since 2015. **opinions are my own**

juanpacheco

As Design Thinking coach, I’m working in product and service design from the visioning up to delivery. Unlearn things is a challenge, but so far is best way to create new one experiences.

Juan Pacheco

Written by

LATAM BDM (Business Development Manager) @ TCS Interactive | Design Thinking coach and Senior UX Designer, NLP practitioner since 2015. **opinions are my own**

juanpacheco

As Design Thinking coach, I’m working in product and service design from the visioning up to delivery. Unlearn things is a challenge, but so far is best way to create new one experiences.

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store