Photo by Maxim Smith on Unsplash

Taking action Or avoiding triviality

Boredom Is The Mind Inspiring For A Different Action


States of mind don’t last. It is always fluctuating from high to low and from low to high.

You might feel bored, unmotivated, and exhausted. But 1 hour from now, it might be the reverse. You might feel down and depress in the afternoon, but excited and happy in the evening.

It’s always changing.

In our lowest spirits, acting on a decision feels like acting during the lastest stage of drunkenness. Our mood is a mixture of sleepiness and confusion while actions seem to require endless efforts.


You know when you have decided to exercise, write, read, work on a project, or go outside but don’t because you don’t feel like it. Because you’d rather sleep than move an inch of your body. Because you are mindlessly browsing the web for something distracting and numbing — like a video or useless social media contents.

Yeah, that.

Well, in these silly moments of inaction and laziness, I ask myself

  • What am I doing? and What are the consequences?(emotionally, physically, psychologically)?
  • What could be an alternative? and What are the consequences?

I always kind of know what I should be doing but it’s never clear enough to make me act.

By bringing these questions to my mind it will help me take a rational approach to my feeling. It will help clarify my decision. It will help lay out the path for better decisions.

Sometimes it’s enough to snap me out of this sleepy state of mind. Sometimes it’s not enough. But when it is, it will push you beyond your current feeling of coziness.

To exercise or not to exercise, what is the answer?

When I get home from work, I’m always lethargic and unmotivated. I rarely want to workout — or write for that matter. No matter how much I hate numbing myself, no matter how bored I am, I prefer to stay on my computer and distract myself.

What am I doing?

Distracting myself while aware I’m wasting time.

Consequences?

Since I’m aware of my current situation but struggle to act against it, there is a strong possibility I might feel guilty for my inaction and depress from the lack of whatever hormone exercising produces.

What could be an alternative?

Running. Or walking 15 minutes to the gym and exercise.

Consequences?

I know for a fact that exercising wakes me up. I know it makes me happy. Sure, the 15 minutes walk and training will take 2 hours of my life, but at least it’s healthy for my body and my soul. And 2 hours of movement is better than 2 hours of numbing and sitting.

I don’t even need to train that much. Just acting the decision is enough.


A rule of thumb never represents reality completely. Being wrong, they should, at least, bring more upside than downside in the long run.