Not a week goes by and another company publishes its commitment to embrace post-pandemic remote work.

As employers, we have an opportunity to create an even better workplace — one that allows us to be more connected to each other, find more balance between work and home, and advance equality — ultimately leading to increased innovation and better business outcomes.” — Salesforce

The overwhelming answer from the tech workforce is that remote work is here to stay. However, we still need to iron out some bits, like difficulties in collaboration and communication.

2021 State of Remote Work from Buffer

Remote collaboration and communication are of particular interest…


In a previous post, I looked at the importance of Emotional Intelligence (EQ) for managers. Here’s what I found about how to use EQ when dealing with conflict.

I believe we shouldn’t strive for zero-conflict environments because I suspect those are pretty dead ones.

Conflict is part of our evolutionary past, it’s the way our world works and we can use it to drive us forward or set us back.

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Photo by icon0.com from Pexels

I’ve identified four cases when conflict leads to difficult situations in the workplace.

  1. There’s a difference in perception
  2. There’s a wrong assumption about intent
  3. Feelings go unheard
  4. The focus is…


I had an interesting conversation with a friend on Monday, about the first 90 days of a new leadership role. I started with a few mental notes and ended with a written series by Friday. I wrote about leadership and empathy based on my experience at Touco and before. I’m curious to know how other peers in the industry relate to it.

If you’re wondering why I’m qualified to give well-meaning advice, aside from being a tech lead and manager in my many startup adventures, I have formal management training and I’m a certified Project Manager.

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Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

I find that the…


In this article, I’m writing about why companies should invest in a culture of coaching, starting with their leaders and managers, as well as how that can be kickstarted with very simple and effective steps.

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Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

Why coaching is an essential leadership skill

It’s not particularly clear why a company should invest in a culture of coaching. In fact, in business school, I had a module on Managing the Growing Firm, which taught many great things like organisational design with the five phases of growth and the managerial styles for each. However captivating that was, I found it a bit too traditional for modern, dynamic workplaces like startups.


Previously, I wrote a mini survival guide for the first 90 days in a new engineering management role.

In this two-part series, I’m looking at a few types of engineering management problems I faced and suggest some solutions I applied.

Here I’ll address scaling and prioritisation problems. Next, I’ll look at communication, team bonding and diversity problems.

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Photo by Karla Hernandez on Unsplash

If you’re wondering why I’m qualified to give well-meaning advice, aside from being a tech lead, manager and technical founder, I have formal management training and I’m a certified Project Manager. I’m also part of the CTO Craft mentoring circles. I recommend their…


In a previous post, I wrote about how asynchronous communications beneficial for meaningful decisions, fair evaluations and fast learning.

But like everything else, asynchronous communication has pitfalls and trade-offs worth exploring.

I’ve recently been invited on a CTO Craft panel to talk about Tools & Processes for Effective Technical Documentation. One of the questions I answered was “What are common anti-patterns? When you should not document?”.

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Spoiler alert: not everything can or should be documented in code.

Based on that, here are my top DON’Ts of asynchronous communication, with a documentation flavour in mind.

1) Don’t create more cognitive load than needed.

Any new information creates some cognitive load, but we shouldn’t abuse it.

“The downside of asynchronous communication…


In a series of previous posts, I wrote about how being emotionally intelligent makes us more competent leaders and comes in handy when we’re faced with conflict management.

In this post, I’m writing about negotiating in a collaborative problem-solving mode that keeps the conversation going.

Almost everything in life requires good negotiation but we’re often afraid of it and simply avoid it. Avoidance is bad because we can’t get better at something without taking the risk, practising, failing and learning what works.

I compiled a list of the techniques I’ve applied in my career so far.

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Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash

Mirror to listen better

I already wrote about…


In a series of previous posts, I mentioned a thought-provoking entrepreneurial strategy framework not many founders I’ve met know about. I also described the four strategies — Intellectual Property, Value Chain, Architecture and Disruption with examples from the wider industry.

In this final post, I’m writing about how these strategies could’ve worked out for Touco and what we ended up doing.

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The clock on the wall counts down the time remaining from the Techstars 2020 programme

We had the thrilling opportunity to actually dry run lots of commercialisation strategies in Barclays Techstars 2020, during the peek of the programme, appropriately called Mentor Madness. …


In a series of previous posts, I mentioned a thought-provoking strategy framework not many founders I’ve met know about. I also wrote about the four factors influencing the choice of a particular strategy.

In this post, I’m briefly describing the four strategies, with examples from the wider industry.

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Photo by Bruno Wolff on Unsplash

Founders have four sliders — customers, competition, technology and identity — to adjust and move their company across axes between collaboration and competition and between execution and control.

  • Customers: target a new, underserved segment or an existing segment.
  • Competition: collaborate or compete.
  • Technology and Identity: execute fast or invest in long-time control.


In a series of previous posts, I hinted at a compelling strategy framework not many founders I’ve met know about. I also wrote about how being both effectual and strategic leads to unavoidable cognitive dissonance.

Here I’m continuing with four factors influencing the choice of strategy: Customers, Competitors, Technology and Identity.

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Photo by Stefan Steinbauer on Unsplash

As founders, we need to make choices about how to create and capture value from our idea. The framework helps us decide by analysing four factors:

  1. Competition
  2. Customers
  3. Technology
  4. Identity

I like to think about these factors like sliders. When dragged, it pushes the startup down a system of…

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