Pentecost

A day to celebrate

Bob Jasper
Koinonia

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Photo by K. Mitch Hodge on Unsplash

We Christians celebrate Pentecost on the seventh Sunday after Easter. The word “Pentecost” comes from the Greek word pentekoste, meaning fiftieth.

Pentecost is so named because we celebrate it on the fiftieth day after Easter.

According to Acts 2:1–4 (NRSUE):

“When the day of Pentecost had come, they [Jesus’ followers] were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting.

Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.”

On Pentecost, we celebrate the Holy Spirit descending upon the 12 Disciples and other followers of Jesus. We wear red to remind us of those “tongues of fire” that reached out and touched each worshiper, enabling them to speak in foreign languages. Pastors put on red stoles and red cloths to decorate church altars.

Some think that this account in Acts denotes the first appearance of the Holy Spirit, but it does not. The Holy Spirit shows up in many earlier passages.

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Bob Jasper
Koinonia

My Muse is in hiding, but we cross paths from time to time. I think I gave the old guy too much grief. Maybe he quit without notice.