To view this video in 360° on your mobile device or VR headset, watch here.

Who Made My Clothes: 360° Factory Tour

I turned 40 this week. In my lifetime, I’ve traveled to over 50 countries. Work trips have usually been to visit factories where our clothes are sewn or phones are assembled. I’ve often wondered, “Why am I the only one who gets to see behind the curtain to what life is like for a factory worker?”

Three years ago, on April 24th — 1,134 people were killed and over 2,500 injured when the Rana Plaza factory collapsed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This event sparked a reaction from consumers and business leaders asking “Why don’t we have better visibility into the reality of factory working conditions?”

One reason is that factories are inaccessible, in gated compounds from Peru to Pakistan, and Mexico to Myanmar. The same is true of refugee camps, where thousands of people are invisible. The UN used Virtual Reality (VR) to bring refugees closer, to capture their daily reality and make it visible to you.

We were inspired by this. What if we could use VR to bring you closer to the people sewing your clothes?

Watch this 360° tour of a factory in India. Imagine you are there, standing next to the worker who sewed your shirt. What questions would you ask?

To view this video in 360° on your mobile device (highly recommended), watch here.

What can you see and what can you not see? Is she able to save enough money for an emergency or to send her kids to school? Does she have access to clean drinking water? Is she harassed by her supervisor?


This week, our friends at Fashion Revolution are asking the question #WhoMadeMyClothes to companies and consumers around the world.

This VR video is our answer. Join us in pulling back the curtain on who made our clothes, and start asking the questions that lead to real impact.

#Laborlink #dataforimpact


Visit http://goodworldsolutions.org/ to learn more about Laborlink
Thank you to I AM CARDBOARD — PHILIPPINES for shooting this short film!
One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.