Laura Kasinof reporting in Yemen. (©Samuel Aranda)

Ex-NYT reporter Laura Kasinof joins Latterly as contributing writer

We’re excited to announce that Laura Kasinof, whose war reporting during Yemen’s Arab Spring became the basis of her book Don’t Be Afraid of the Bullets, is joining Latterly as a regular contributing writer. Kasinof is currently based in Berlin, where she covers refugees and migration on a grant from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. For Latterly, she will write on these issues, plus conflict and politics, particularly in the Middle East.

Kasinof joins the Latterly team thanks to our members. Readers who join now will receive a free paperback copy of her book and can join Kasinof for discussion in our members-only Slack channel. Click here for more details.

“Kasinof’s addition to Latterly is part of a new era for our publication,” Latterly Editor Ben Wolford said. “When we started, we focused all our resources on long, immersive narratives. Since launching on the Medium platform, we’re growing our readership and taking on global social justice issues on a more daily basis.”

Kasinof

In 2011 and 2012, Kasinof covered the turmoil of the Arab Spring from Sanaa, Yemen, for The New York Times, racking up nearly 200 bylines for the newspaper. She speaks Arabic and has reported on conflict, migration and politics from at least seven different countries.

Writing to Latterly members from Spain, where she’s reporting a feature story about a Syrian refugee, Kasinof said, “This trip has been another example of how incredible it is to be in Europe at this time covering migration. It’s incredibly sad, but also full of human stories that I feel grateful to experience.”

Latterly has always had a particular interest in refugee rights. Last year, it first published a photo essay called “Unwelcome,” which inspired an ethical line of clothing. This summer, Latterly devoted several stories to the inhumane treatment of refugees on the island of Nauru, a de facto Australian prison colony. Kasinof’s reporting will shed further light on the people and policies surrounding one of the greatest moral issues of the century.


Become a member today and receive a free copy of her book, Don’t Be Afraid of the Bullets.
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