Become A Leadership Superstar

In a position of business leadership there is the constant feeling that you are involved in a game of tug of war between ownership/investors and your employees. In this scenario the manager gets to play the role of the proverbial knot. This is the classic catch 22 of being a leader. You need ownership/investors to be happy with your work for obvious reasons. You want to stay employed and earn opportunity for more responsibility as well as be recognized for your efforts to receive bonuses and raises as you go. You also want to minimize the activities that cause angst for the folks in charge. It is also important to attempt to please your team members which makes for a pleasant and respectful working environment. If they sense you have their backs and are fighting for their causes they will be more inclined to go to the battlefield for you. Should they feel that their interests are not being adequately represented, they may lose faith in your leadership and become slack in their response to policy and protocol. However, as the saying goes in business and as I have learned along the way, the more time you spend trying to make everyone happy the greater the chances are that NO ONE will be. So how do you navigate this situation which seems to be a losing proposition?

Almost no professionals actually put the company before their own needs and desires, certainly not the employees and even the owners/investors themselves are sometimes self destructive. You see, everyone subconsciously makes decisions based on personal biases of what they think will help THEMSELVES. The compensation structure of most employees is predominantly based on their personal achievements not on the success of the business as a whole. It takes a very special employee to care about what they do and how their actions affect the company’s branding or bottom line. Owners are a whole other story completely. They truly believe that everything they do is for the sake of the business and that the business comes first. It may be hard to believe that an owner would not always do what is best for their company. However, think of how many examples you have of an owner making decisions based on emotional factors that in many cases, are counterproductive to the business. Owners make personnel and client related decisions all the time, based on who they have personal relationships with or are drawn to rather than the most optimal decision possible.

This is where you as a leader in the business get to come in and be the level headed decision maker. The employee who influences not what their boss instructed them to, but the RIGHT decision. One of the the most important attributes of an effective leader is to consider all the facts of a situation and do what is right. The key here will make you an absolute superstar. Do not let the opinions of others affect your instincts, especially since the outcome will likely not create positivity for everyone involved. Implementing this philosophy will start with skepticism from the ownership group, your team and you will even begin to second guess yourself with the complaints starting to roll in. You need to stay confident and be patient and this strategy will lead you to success where many others have failed.

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