The 9 Major League Baseball Players With Over 600 Career Homeruns

Do you know all 9?

A baseball card of Willie Mays.
Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1951_Bownman_Willie_Mays.jpg

In Major League Baseball, the 500 Homerun Club is an exclusive group.

Currently, only twenty-eight players are in the 500 Homerun Club. What’s even more exclusive, however, is the 600 Homerun Club.

Do you know the nine MLB players who hit over 600 home runs in their careers?

#9 — Sammy Sosa (609 Homeruns)

Sammy Sosa played eighteen seasons. He played for four different teams during his career: the Texas Rangers (1989, 2007), the Chicago White Sox (1989–1991), the Chicago Cubs (1992–2004), and the Baltimore Orioles (2005).

Sosa was a seven-time All-Star and won the MVP award in 1998. He played the majority of his career as a Right Fielder.

#8 — Jim Thome (612 Homeruns)

Jim Thome played twenty-two seasons. He played for six different teams: the Cleveland Indians (1991–2002, 2011), the Philadelphia Phillies (2003–2005, 2012), the Chicago White Sox (2006–2009), the Los Angeles Dodgers (2009), the Minnesota Twins (2010–2011), and the Baltimore Orioles (2012).

Thome was a five-time All-Star and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. Jim Thome was primarily a First Basemen.

#7 — Ken Griffey Jr. (630 Homeruns)

Ken Griffey Jr. played twenty-two years. He played for three teams throughout his career: the Seattle Mariners (1989–1999, 2009–2010), the Cincinnati Reds (2000–2008), and the Chicago White Sox (2008).

Ken Griffey Jr. was voted an All-Star thirteen times and won the MVP award in 1997. He was inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame in 2016. Ken Griffey Jr. played Center Field.

#6 — Willie Mays (660 Homeruns)

Willie Mays played twenty-three seasons in the Major Leagues. He played for the New York/San Francisco Giants (1951–1952, 1954–1972) and the New York Mets (1972–1973).

He was selected to be an All-Star twenty times and won the MVP award in 1954 and 1965. Mays was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979. Willie Mays was a twelve-time Gold Glove winner in Center Field.

As far as all-around talent goes, Willie Mays is perhaps the greatest baseball player of all time.

#5 — Albert Pujols (679 Homeruns)

Albert Pujols is the only player on this list still playing as of January 2022. He has played twenty-one seasons. Pujols has played for three teams: the St. Louis Cardinals (2001–2011), the Los Angeles Angels (2012–2021), and the Los Angeles Dodgers (2021).

Albert Pujols has been selected to ten All-Star games and has won three MVP awards (2005, 2008, 2009). Albert Pujols is primarily a First Basemen.

#4 — Alex Rodriguez (696 Homeruns)

Alex Rodriguez played twenty-two seasons. He played for three teams: the Seattle Mariners (1994–2000), the Texas Rangers (2001–2003), and the New York Yankees (2004–2013, 2015–2016).

Alex Rodriguez was voted an All-Star fourteen times and won three MVP awards (2003, 2005, 2007). He split his career between Shortstop and Third Base.

#3 — Babe Ruth (714 Homeruns)

Babe Ruth played twenty-two seasons. He played for three teams: the Boston Red Sox (1914–1919), the New York Yankees (1920–1934), and the Boston Braves (1935).

Babe Ruth won seven World Series as a New York Yankee. He started his career as a Pitcher but eventually moved to the Outfield. Babe Ruth was likely the greatest pure home run hitter in MLB history.

#2 — Henry Aaron (755 Homeruns)

Henry (or Hank) Aaron played for twenty-three seasons. He played for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves (1954–1974) and the Milwaukee Brewers (1975–1976).

Hank Aaron was an All-Star twenty-one years in a row. He won the MVP award in 1957. Aaron was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.

No player was more consistent over a long time than Hank Aaron. He hit twenty or more home runs in twenty straight seasons from 1955 to 1974.

#1 — Barry Bonds (762 Homeruns)

Barry Bonds played for twenty-two seasons. He played on two teams: the Pittsburgh Pirates (1986–1992) and the San Francisco Giants (1993–2007).

Barry Bonds was voted an All-Star fourteen times and won seven MVP awards (1990, 1992–1993, 2001–2004). He holds the single-season record for home runs with 73.

His career is shrouded by the steroid scandal that rocked baseball during the 1990s and early 2000s. Baseball’s home run king perhaps had an unfair advantage by using steroids.

Who on this list is your favorite?

My favorite has always been Hank Aaron.

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