3 Tips on Building Strong Relationships with Employees

Lindsay Guion
Mar 26, 2019 · 3 min read

Gallup surveys revealed that organizations with highly-engaged employees are 21 percent more profitable than their less-engaged competitors. And in separate but related research, Aberdeen Group found that organizations with engaged employees enjoy a staggering 233 percent higher rate of customer loyalty than their less-engaged competitors.

In light of this abundantly clear message, organizations should build strong relationships with employees. The fact remains that significant and sustained employee engagement is not the norm; it’s the exception. In the view of internationally-acclaimed music industry executive Lindsay Guion, the Founder, CEO and Global Chairman of GUION PARTNERS, this is less about intent, and more about strategy and tactics.

According to Lindsay Guion, the fundamentals of employment engagement are rooted in the following three areas:

Earning Trust vs. Assuming It

Trust in any kind of relationship must be earned rather than assumed. As such, leaders (which could include supervisors, managers and executives as applicable) must earn the trust of employees by being open, transparent, fair and empowering. Obviously, there are common sense limitations to this advice.

Leaders cannot share information about a potential or imminent merger if those details are confidential. In the same light, sharing private or sensitive information about one employee with another is not just wrong, but it’s illegal. However, there are many day-to-day opportunities where leaders can and should earn trust. Lindsay Guion explains that there is no shortcut for earning trust, it requires time and commitment from both parties.

Communicating vs. Dictating

This means that leaders must actively listen to their staff to grasp what is really being said; and often just as importantly, what is not being said. It also means asking helpful questions to get the full story, rather than rushing to judgement and pre-maturely reaching (often erroneous) conclusions. Lindsay Guion added that from his experience, leaders who openly admit when they do not know something are far better at building trust with employees than those who pretend to have all the answers.

Reward and Recognize Small Wins — Not Just Big Achievements

Lindsay Guion — Final Thoughts

Lindsay Guion

Lindsay Guion has always been interested in entertainment…

Lindsay Guion

Lindsay Guion has always been interested in entertainment, sports, and technology. He is an active member of the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association.

Lindsay Guion

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Lindsay Guion is a personal manager that works with Grammy award-winning artists, songwriters, and producers.

Lindsay Guion

Lindsay Guion has always been interested in entertainment, sports, and technology. He is an active member of the Black Entertainment and Sports Lawyers Association.