Selling Saliva

An Indonesian idiom for preachers grabbing your money.

Tjahaja
Virtually Every Language

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Photo by Jan Ranft on Unsplash

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many people started to worry about their financial future. The endless plague had shattered the courage of many of us.

At that time, a huge niche of anxious people emerged. But their emergence only gave the stage to the financial gurus and their words. They became preachers before the altars of money religion.

My friends and family started to believe in the investment ideas recited by the gurus. Mutual funds, foreign exchanges, and stocks were some ways to exercise our faith in money.

We even testified to the bulls and bears of cryptocurrencies. Those topics were unthinkable among us before the lockdown.

I was one of the pious people in the niche, venturing out into the sea of financial verses. I was thirsty for financial revelations. And I was ready to drench myself with whatever sprung from the mouths of the gurus.

People selling their saliva captivated me.

My mistake

My mistake was that I listened to their sermons. I should have questioned their credibility in the first place. Instead, I risked my money on schemes I didn’t understand. My blind belief overtook my critical thinking.

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Tjahaja
Virtually Every Language

Indonesian translator. Translating from: English, Indonesian, Javanese, Dutch, and Greek. Translating to: Indonesian, Javanese, and English.