How to be a Great Writer: 4 Powerful Insights from Marilyn Robinson

Better. Bolder. Braver. Kinder.

Melissa Gouty
Literature Lust

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Photo by Jodie Cook on Unsplash

Marilynne Robinson won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2005 with her novel, Gilead, a book of deep, spiritual meaning and a philosophical, rather than action-oriented, plot. Gilead is proof that a “different” kind of novel can win acclaim. It’s also proof that an author has to be true to herself rather than worry about what the publishing world wants.

In a recent interview with David Marchese of the New York Times, Robinson answered questions about her work, her oeuvre, and her thoughts on modern life.

Whether you need justification, motivation, or inspiration, writers will benefit from these four powerful insights from Marilynne Robinson.

ONE: Your language doesn’t have to match the tone of other people’s language

Robinson bemoans the attitude and language commonplace now. She admits being “surprised, shocked, and disillusioned” by the “vulgarity and mercilessness that have entered public conversation.” (Me, too.)

Known for writings that embrace goodness, Robinson’s words remind writers that it’s ok to rise above the crowd. While it’s commonplace to use obscenities to get people’s attention, you don’t…

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Melissa Gouty
Literature Lust

Writer, teacher, speaker, and observer of human nature. Content for HVAC & Plumbing Businesses. Author of The Magic of Ordinary. LiteratureLust and GardenGlory.