ActionJacksonn taking Live.me fast track to growing a community, putting money in the bank

What makes a live broadcast lit?

ActionJacksonn, a 26-year-old Live.me broadcaster based in Southern California, figured it out recently on a six-plus-hour live party.

“I was never going to go live on this day because I wasn’t getting recognized,” ActionJacksonn said. “I had, like, 4,000 diamonds left, and was like, ‘This is going to be my last broadcast ever.’ And then I had my lights on, my music on, and I was getting turnt up. I was having a party.

“I was on until like 2 o’clock in the morning, just turning up, having fun. People started giving me gifts — big gifts, small gifts, medium gifts. And I was like, ‘Oh my God; y’all are super lit! This is too lit!’”

“I was like, ‘Oh my God! Y’all are super lit — this is too lit!’”

“Someone came across my broadcast and said, ‘This is the Litty City,’” he continued. “And I’m like, ‘Wait a minute. I want to start a squad called the Litty City Committee of people who want to become lit, people who want to go to a broadcast that’s lit. If you’re a lit person, put LCC in your name. We’re just going to be the committee of lit people.’”

That night, the Litty City Committee (LCC) was born.


You might recognize ActionJacksonn — his real name is David Jackson — from other places, like YouTube and Instagram; but on Live.me, he explains, the intimacy and engagement level is a totally different vibe.

“Each platform, I’m always a different person — but always the same. I’m ActionJacksonn, so when you hear the action, I’m always bringing some type of action in my actions,” he said. “If I’m YouTube, I gotta be comedy. If I’m Instagram, I gotta be more funny, more dramatic. If I’m Live.me, I gotta be more, like, you gotta dance, you gotta make the people feel like they’re there with you.”

He points to the growth rate on Live.me as a huge plus.

“Live.me is a much easier platform to grow,” Jackson said, comparing his 33,000 followers in a year on Instagram to his 22,000 Live.me followers in just three months.

But his Live.me audience is much more than a number.

“You get dedicated fans [on Live.me] that want to watch you do what you do. It’s a huge, huge opportunity for me to not only inspire people, not only give people opportunities, not only share my life, where I came from to help them out, but you build a friendship.”

“What other app is there that you can just sit there, be yourself and make money?”

Live.me users can collect “diamonds” and other gifts from viewers and turn those gifts into cash. For creators looking for a way to connect with their own audiences and make money at the same time, Jackson said Live.me offers a unique opportunity.

“Live.me is a huge, huge opportunity to grow a faster audience. You can sell your merchandise; you can advertise other platforms. You can make money off of it,” he said. “What other app [is there] that you can just sit there, be yourself and make money? So, if you’re a creator and you’re already pleasing that audience somewhere else just to get views, why not create an audience on here and get money instead of views?”

Jackson said a recent conversation with a fellow YouTuber led to a moment of enlightenment.

“I said, ‘You’re a dancer. Why don’t you go live and say [you’re] dancing? Now, let’s get creative. Teach a tutorial every week, and teach them how to do this, or teach them how to do that for this amount of money,’” he said. “You never know where it can go. I can’t stress it enough how many opportunities I had to go live, wasn’t expecting anything, and got something out of it. It’s a huge marketing [and] networking tool; it’s a huge fan grower. It’s amazing.”

Is Jackson making legitimate income on Live.me?

“Yes, now I am,” he said. “I’ve been doing this for three months… Maybe two months ago, I was a 60/40 person; I would put in 60 to get 40 back. But now, since people are recognizing me, and they say, ‘Oh, ActionJacksonn is this person now, ActionJacksonn is famous on this app,’ or whatever, they’re starting to give me more gifts, and it’s a huge, huge blessing and opportunity that Live.me has done. I’m now starting to make money off of it… I know there’s plenty of people that make way more money than me; but yeah, it’s a good way to make money.”

Jackson points to his personal success in such a short period of time as proof that Live.me is a valuable opportunity for the blossoming generation of digital stars.

“I really feel like social media right now is the key to success,” said Jackson, who is building a global audience from his small-town suburban home. “Back in the day, you had to go to multiple auditions. You had to send out headshots to multiple agents. Now, they come to you. ‘Let’s work, let’s work, let’s work.’”

Although he’s relatively new to Live.me, Jackson said he could foresee his own success from the moment he first checked out other broadcasters on the app.

“I’m watching, and things are just killing me. That person is funny, but I’m funnier,” he said. “That person is live and lit, but I can be more live and more lit.”

“Try to find something that will feel entertaining to others… Challenge yourself to do different things!”

His advice for a new livecaster?

“Try to find something that will feel entertaining to others, and try to engage and make them a part of your actions that you’re doing on live. Challenge yourself to do different things,” he said.

And, as with many things in life, consistency is key.

“I would definitely tell them to stay consistent. Get on there, and your minimum time is an hour. Eventually, someone will find you, and you’ll develop a friendship with that person,” Jackson, who broadcasts every Sunday at 1 p.m. Pacific, said. “Every day, get on there, and stay on there consistently for at least an hour a day.”

But if you don’t have time to broadcast an hour a day, ActionJacksonn invites you to Live.me, to join the Litty City Committee.

“I’m always lit when I go live,” he said. “If you’re lit, I’m lit. Let’s make a Litty City, baby.”

By Chris Strub — the first man to live-stream in all 50 U.S. states and an honorary member of the Litty Citty Committee