Four Things You Gain by Fostering Curiosity as an Adult

What we lose in childhood could drastically improve our lives

Trudy Horsting
Living Out Loud

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Photo by Jeremiah Lawrence on Unsplash

Growing up, students are often deemed “gifted,” standard, or in need of some extra assistance. However, as we age, these delineations are less clear. Although I don’t deny a level of natural intelligence that comes with IQ, I think there is a terrible lack of attention on curiosity.

Those who are curious and, most importantly, who act on that curiosity, are some of the most brilliant people I have ever met.

Most importantly, they are some of the most fulfilled people I have ever met.

Childhood Curiosity

As children, we are all naturally curious. We ask why the sky is blue and why the grass is green. We ask why vegetables are good for us and why we have blonde hair. We ask why we must go to sleep and why we can’t have ice cream for dinner. We ask questions, and we are persistent in repeating these questions until they are answered for us.

As we age, we often lose some, but not all, of this curiosity. We wonder less, but we still wonder. And, of course, what we wonder about changes a bit. We may wonder why Burger King always builds next door to McDonalds. We may wonder what it would be like to switch careers. We…

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Trudy Horsting
Living Out Loud

Writer. PhD Candidate. Frugal Traveler. Passionate about health, personal growth, and saving money.