Time Perception, Ferris Bueller, and Fairytales: Lux Recommends #16

By Sam Arbesman

Welcome to Lux Recommends #16, the newest edition of what we at Lux are reading and thinking about.

Articles

Fairytales much older than previously thought, say researchers: The evolutionary history of folktales. Original paper here. — Sam

The Manhattan Project Fallacy: An exploration of the idea that Silicon Valley needs to solve big problems, and whether it makes sense. — Sam

Searching for the Algorithms Underlying Life: “The biological world is computational at its core, argues computer scientist Leslie Valiant. His ‘ecorithm’ approach uses computational concepts to explore fundamental mysteries of evolution and the mind.”— Josh

How the brain perceives time: The intricate and complex world of how the brain keeps time on a cellular level. — Adam G

We Hung Out in Ferris Bueller’s Bedroom with the Artists Who Recreated It — Bilal/Adam K

The Future is Here. It Just Needs a Big Push: “The idea, in other words, is that we should be able to take the most radical technologies in evidence in the world’s research centers, tech capitals and corporate campuses and diffuse them to most of the people on Earth. And if we think that market fundamentals alone will get us there, there’s an entire history of world wars, subsidized infrastructure and even the genesis of the Internet itself that suggests that notion has outlived its utility.” — Sam

Finetoothed: a great new blog on some big ideas in science, technology, and business.

And in memoriam, Marvin Minsky, a pioneer of artificial intelligence.

Books

Luke Skywalker Can’t Read: And Other Geeky Truths, by Ryan Britt: I just started reading this fun series of essays on elements of nerd culture. Reminds of the style of Chuck Klosterman. — Sam

Movies

The Imitation Game: “Sometimes it’s the very people who no one imagines anything of who do the things no one can imagine.” — Adam G

Plus, a video game in real life. — Adam G

Science Facts

75 percent of the world’s food is generated from only 12 plants and five animal species” — Adam K

17th Century Fact: Astronomer Johannes Kepler was tried for witchcraft. — Sam

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