hashmap
JavaScript. Angular. Firebase. Flutter.
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Issue 07 of weekly Wednesday newsletter

Last year, I was lucky to get myself attached to a Flutter project. It wasn’t a big app but big enough for me to learn a lot of things very quickly. Here is a post on codota.com I wrote that delves into an outline of the core idea that governs Flutter’s entire system.

Making Sense of Flutter’s Widget System

Naturally, midway through projects, Windows will always want you to update. While the aim is to fix things, it usually breaks more things than it needs to. For developers, it means wiped environment variables, along with a few other things. …


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Newsletter #006 from Hashmap

Hi there!

When I started coding, I just wanted to create. At some point, code became my career. However, there was a period in my life where I started hating the act of coding. It took a while to figure out what and why it happened. For this week’s piece, I explored the concept of what code actually is and how it impacts us on a mental level.

The Misconceptions About Dev Work And How It Drains Our Spark

Throw Back Pieces

Back in August/Septemeber 2020, I released a mini-series on patterns. Patterns are important because they provide structure to the code while giving it a universal way of implementing ideas without the need to reinvent the wheel. …


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What to do when you start questioning your career as a dev

Let’s get real, we all got into coding because we had a dream. At some point between being a complete code noob and becoming a semi-proficient dev, our dreams got lost and sidelined to the job requirements, the daily standups, the meetings, and the day job. By the time the sun sets and we finally get home, we have other life obligations like conversing with our other half.

Then one day, we wake up and realize that we are no longer feeling inspired by a thing called code and life suddenly becomes a grind. You suddenly feel stuck, unable to move because you are financially tied to your day job. You can’t quit. You can’t imagine yourself in a different department or field but you know you want out. …


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A weekly recap/newsletter

A weekly recap/newsletter

2020 was a weird year and 2021 will probably be a little weirder with the various things happening around the world right now. On a happier note, one thing that won’t change any time soon is the industry’s need for skilled developers and programmers who can think and synthesize creatively.

This week’s edition includes exploring the idea of what ‘good code’ looks like, dealing with knowledge inflation as a developer, and a side piece on how to make 2020–2030 your best decade ever. 2020 was only the first year. …


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there’s always going to be something to learn but when does it ever end?

As developers, it can feel like we’re treading water all the time. You’re constantly expected to learn, to discover, to uncover, to make, and to create. This, of course, is in your own time. In addition to everything else that we also have going on in life, the simple task of staying up to date can tire you out, sap your time, or become downright overwhelming.

Technology as an industry is constantly coming out with new updates, releases, libraries, frameworks, and ideas. The sheer amount of information that gets thrown in our direction seems to grow exponentially each year. It’s part of the knowledge inflation that has ballooned out in recent years. …


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I’ve been publishing newsletters over at linkedIn. I’m going to start doing them here too on Medium.

2020 in review

This year has been a weirdly disruptive and lemon kind of year. But when life gives you lemons, you make a lemon cake. Here’s what my cake looks like.

Medium

My technical writing journey started on Medium, way back in 2019. I was writing on the platform before that but didn’t really start writing about code until early last year.

A few months ago, I decided to leave every major publication on Medium and created my own. I did this because I wanted to retain my voice as a writer, build better relationships with my readers, and have better control over what happened to the pieces I published. While this initially shrank my distribution and readership, my new publication did manage to snap up 1.1k …


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Image by Aphinya Dechalert. Originally published at srgsoftware.io.

it’s more than just throwing a bunch of people together

It’s a common misconception in software development that in order to build a piece of quality software, it’s necessary to have a certain number of developers who are at different ranks and levels, each specializing in specific areas.

While this might be true for the 90s and early 2000s, the world of custom software development has changed so much that the old-world method of creating teams will only result in reduced software delivery cycles, potential delays, and sunk cost spending.

What matters more in 2020 and beyond is having the right people. With widespread industry shortages, it’s easier to employ the services of multiple organizations and create organizational teams than a fully internal cross-functional team. …


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image by Aphinya Dechalert

And what to do about it

Once you get a job, it’s easy to get stuck into trading your time for a paycheck. You take the commute, get into the office, brew your coffee, take it to your desk, sit down, and start tapping.

Sometimes, there might be a meeting here and there, a debate with your fellow developers over a module or implementation.

You end your day by going home, going to sleep, and then waking up to do it all over again.

It sounds monotonous. But you convinced yourself otherwise.

Because work is part of life — just like bills, rent, utilities, groceries, and every other little thing in life that chips away at your paycheck. …


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image by Aphinya Dechalert

vanilla JavaScript explained simply

At some point, you might have encountered Object.defineProperty() in someone’s code. It might be through an Angular, React, or Vue project.

However, Object.defineProperty() isn’t actually specific to any of the listed framework/library. It’s actually part of vanilla JavaScript.

Vanilla JavaScript is the foundation of every JavaScript-based library, project, module, and widget. It is just JavaScript in its purest form — unfiltered, no-prewritten configurations and structural requirements. When we work in Angular, React or Vue, we are working with JavaScript.

As we move towards frameworks and libraries, many devs are missing out on the finer details of the scripting language. Which is why Object.defineProperty()


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image by Aphinya Dechalert

Beyond the code, what’s your selling point?

Everyone can code. It’s so easy that even kids are doing it. When you boil it down, code is just translating bits of logic into another format. Once you’ve got the general ideas down (loops, if-else, functions, classes, methods, modules, and general relationships), you can make almost anything you can dream up.

Code itself is not hard.

It’s the itty bitty side bits that make it hard.

For the frontend, there’s an additional visual layer. …

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