Magda On Cyber
Published in

Magda On Cyber

Cyber Risk Management and Quantification: What You Need To Know

Quantifying cyber risk is a relatively new field. Despite this, it is becoming increasingly important as businesses become more and more digitized. In order to properly manage cyber risk, you need to understand what it is and how to quantify it.

There are a few different ways to quantify cyber risk. One way is to measure the likelihood of an attack. This can be done by looking at the past history of attacks, the current threat landscape, and the vulnerabilities of your systems. Another way to quantify cyber risk is to measure the impact of an attack. This can be done by looking at the financial cost of an attack, the reputational damage, and the operational impact.

In this blog post, we will discuss the basics of cyber risk management and quantification. We will also provide some tips on how to get started!

Photo by Ibrahim Rifath on Unsplash

Cyber risk quantification helps bridge the gap with business. It’s a great way to communicate with decision-makers, who are often not from a technical background, about the potential consequences of cyber incidents and the likelihood of them happening. Cyber risk quantification can also help you make decisions about where to allocate resources and how to prioritize security initiatives.

When it comes to quantifying cyber risk, there are a few different factors that you need to consider. The first is building scenarios or loss scenarios as used in cyber insurance. This involves thinking about the different ways that an attack could happen and what the consequences would be. The second is understanding your organization’s exposure to risk. This includes looking at things like the number of systems you have, the types of data you store, and your connectivity to other networks. The third is understanding the technical vulnerabilities of your systems. This includes looking at things like patch levels, configuration settings, and access control lists.

Once you have a good understanding of the different factors that go into quantifying cyber risk, you can start to build your own models.

How do you build cyber loss scenarios?

When you are creating a plan for what to do if your company loses data, you need to think about different ways that an attack could happen and what the consequences would be.

Start by brainstorming all of the different ways that an attack could happen. Once you have a list of all the different ways, you can start to assess the impact of each one. The impact can be financial, reputational, or operational.

After you have assessed the impact of each attack, you can start to put together a plan for what to do if one of them happens.

An example of loss scenario is business interruption. A business interruption can have a significant financial impact on a company. It can happen following a cyber attack or a data breach.

What are some of the challenges you face when quantifying cyber risk?

One of the biggest challenges is that there is a lot of uncertainty when it comes to cyber risk. The threat landscape is constantly changing and evolving, which makes it difficult to predict the likelihood of an attack. Additionally, there is a lot of variation in the impact of an attack. The financial cost, reputational damage, and operational impact can all vary depending on the type of attack and the organization.

Another challenge is that cyber risk is often misunderstood or undervalued by decision-makers. This can make it difficult to get the resources you need to properly quantify and manage cyber risk.

What are some tips for getting started with quantifying cyber risk?

If you are just getting started with quantifying cyber risk, here are a few tips:

-Start by understanding the basics of cyber risk management and quantification.

-Build scenarios or loss scenarios to think about the different ways an attack could happen and what the consequences would be.

-Understand your organization’s exposure to risk by looking at things like the number of systems you have, the types of data you store, and your connectivity to other networks.

-Understand the technical vulnerabilities of your systems by looking at things like patch levels, configuration settings, and access control lists.

-Once you have a good understanding of the different factors that go into quantifying cyber risk, you can start to build your own models.

What are the benefits of cyber risk quantification?

Cyber risk quantification can help you make better decisions about where to allocate resources and how to prioritize security initiatives. It can also help you improve your communication with decision-makers about the risks your organization faces.

Cyber risk quantification can help you:

-Allocate resources more effectively

-Prioritize security initiatives

-Communicate risk more effectively to decision-makers

-Make better decisions about where to allocate resources

-Improve your communication with decision-makers about the risks your organization faces.

-Purchase cyber insurance cost-effectively

Cyber insurers are using cyber risk quantification for underwriting and pricing insurance policies. By understanding your organization’s cyber risk, you can purchase insurance that is better aligned with your risks and more cost-effective. Cyber insurance policies are becoming more common, and they can provide valuable financial protection in the event of a data breach or cyber attack, with financial loss protection and incident response support.

Cyber risk quantification is a journey, not a destination. Cyber risk quantification is an ongoing process, not a one-time exercise. Watch the webinar to understand more:

By Magda Chelly

Chief Security Officer | TEDx Speaker | Author & Keynote Speaker | IFSEC Global Top 20 Cybersecurity Influencer | Entrepreneur | PhD, S-CISO, CISSP, Cert SCI (General Insurance)

Find out on magda-on-cyber.com

Follow Magda on Twitter: https://twitter.com/m49D4ch3lly

Awards

Follow Magda on her Social Media Accounts:

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store