Manifesto

Preamble:

Lynne Layton
Nov 4, 2015 · 4 min read

Manifesto:

The project of psychoanalysis has always been a radical one. When, en route to America, Freud told Jung that they were “bringing the plague,” he meant that the unconscious is radically unsettling; it puts into question the fantasy that we are masters in our own house. This dangerous fantasy persists today. Why dangerous? As feminists discovered in the 60s, raising consciousness about sexist oppression itself could not create lasting social change. To best fight oppression, feminists realized that the internalized nature of the oppression, the oppressed self’s unconscious collusions with and perpetuation of sexist relations, had to be dealt with. That recognition heralded a re-appraisal of what psychoanalysis had to offer. But in this age of short-term cure and CBT, psychoanalysis and the unconscious have become marginalized, or worse, met with contempt and ridicule, spoken of as outdated. We are not masters in our own house. The recent spate of articles focusing attention on unconscious racism must serve as a call to action. Each of us is called upon to reckon both with personal and institutional unconscious racism.

Manifesto Fest

psychoanalysts talk about why talking still matters — a manifesto fest. We are accepting manifesto submission (500–1000 words). email esther@studio-st.com

Lynne Layton

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Manifesto Fest

psychoanalysts talk about why talking still matters — a manifesto fest. We are accepting manifesto submission (500–1000 words). email esther@studio-st.com