3 of the Most influential LGBTQ Rugby Players

MatthewsPlace.com
Nov 12 · 4 min read

by Judy Bokao

Among those who have made LGBTQ+ history are the activists and athletes who have left a mark or are still active in the sports world. In a world dominated by straight males, some of these athletes have helped pave the way for other LGBTQ+ athletes whose dream is to join sports professionally. Below are the 3 most influential LGBTQ rugby players:

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Ian Roberts

Before he came out, Roberts tried to hide his gay status by going to clubs with a girl on his arm. And at the same, he would visit gay clubs, and he still had male boyfriends.

After retiring in 1997, Roberts moved on to be an actor. He is a great advocate for gay rights. He is also helping young gay teens in sports deal with their sexuality.

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Gareth Thomas

He came out publicly as HIV positive in 2019 after a reporter turned up at his parents’ house to inform them of his status and asking them for a comment. Thomas said that he decided to make a documentary named Gareth Thomas: HIV and Me because of his experience after coming out positive.

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Levi Davis

Like most people who struggle with their sexuality, Davis is not an exception. He struggled with his relationship and what his partners would think of him.
Davis’s childhood was not easy as he went into foster at seven, and rugby became his savior. He received a rugby scholarship when he was 12 and further immersed himself into the world of rugby. He later joined an English Premiership club, Bath Rugby, and from here, his career kicked off. He also participated in Celebrity X-Factor.

Looking from the outside, you would think he was on top of the world, but Davis was struggling with an identity crisis. He was in denial, and as a result, he started drinking heavily. Speaking to Daily Mail, Davis said that he felt and still feels like he is not normal.

Davis is now rebuilding his rugby career. He signed a two-year contract with a club in West London.

Davis tells others who are also in a similar position, on the verge of coming out, but fear makes you postpone, to rip off the band-aid. Because people are now more open to supporting the LGBTQ+ community and being you makes you happy. Since coming out, he is the happiest, and the icing on the cake is that he can be himself.

About the Author:

Matthew’s Place

MatthewsPlace.com

MatthewsPlace.com

Written by

MatthewsPlace.com is a program of the Matthew Shepard Foundation| Words by & for LGBTQ+ youth | #EraseHate | Want to submit? Email sara@matthewshepard.org

Matthew’s Place

MatthewsPlace.com is a program of the Matthew Shepard Foundation| Words by & for LGBTQ+ youth | #EraseHate | Want to submit for our publication? Email sara@matthewshepard.org

MatthewsPlace.com

Written by

MatthewsPlace.com is a program of the Matthew Shepard Foundation| Words by & for LGBTQ+ youth | #EraseHate | Want to submit? Email sara@matthewshepard.org

Matthew’s Place

MatthewsPlace.com is a program of the Matthew Shepard Foundation| Words by & for LGBTQ+ youth | #EraseHate | Want to submit for our publication? Email sara@matthewshepard.org

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