The Artist, the Thief, the Forger, and Her Lover

How did the “Mona Lisa” become famous? In part five in this series, the biggest art heist of all time connects the forger and the thief.

Rex Sorgatz
Aug 14, 2014 · 8 min read
“Mona Lisa,” c. 1503–1517

She needed to disappear.

Mona Lisa” in the Louvre, before and after the heist.
A clipping from page 4A of the New York Times, on August 25, 1911.

#monalisa


Purloin One, Copy Many

They stole “Mona Lisa” to create #monalisa.


Thick as Forgers

Some movies involving art theft.
Stills from How to Make a Million (1966).
Trailer to How to Steal a Million (1966).

Theft & Forgery: Disappearance & Duplication

Mark Landis.
“I didn’t do anything wrong or illegal,” says Mark Landis in the trailer to Art and Craft. Also, an exhibit, Intent to Deceive, traveling around the country, has some of Landis’ forgeries.

Stealing to Copy, Copying to Steal

They forged copies.

Artists riffing on the “Mona Lisa.”

The Message

A Pandaemonium Revolver Collection. Season 2 stars @anildash @alanalevinson @ftrain @hipstercrite @itsthebrandi @jamielaurenkeiles @vijithassar @yungrama @zeynep. Season 1 available on DVD shortly.

    Rex Sorgatz

    Written by

    creative technologist, author, entrepreneur, designer, consultant rexsorgatz@gmail.com

    The Message

    A Pandaemonium Revolver Collection. Season 2 stars @anildash @alanalevinson @ftrain @hipstercrite @itsthebrandi @jamielaurenkeiles @vijithassar @yungrama @zeynep. Season 1 available on DVD shortly.