Female scientist. Marco Hazard on Flickr

Women edged out of last-named authorships in top journals

Study exposes the gender bias in top science journals

Jon Brock
Jon Brock
Jun 25 · 1 min read

This article was originally published at Nature Index in January 2018


Women are significantly under-represented as last authors on high-quality research papers, according to a recent analysis of the journals tracked by the Nature Index.

The study, published in PLoS ONE “shows just how comprehensively men dominate publishing in science,” says Deb Verhoeven, associate dean of engagement and innovation at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), whose recent investigations into research funding in Australia has also uncovered significant gender inequity. “It provides powerful evidence that corroborates what many women already know and have personally experienced as scientists.”

In the study, Michael Bendels and his colleagues from Goethe University Frankfurt am Main extracted authorship information from articles published between 2008 and 2016 in 54 of the 68 journals listed on the Nature Index. The journals were selected by active scientists to represent the upper echelon of publications in the natural sciences.


Continue reading at Nature Index

Dr Jon Brock

Science writings: Neuroscience, psychology, science publishing, open science, science communication

Jon Brock

Written by

Jon Brock

Cognitive scientist, science writer, and co-founder of Frankl Open Science. Thoughts my own, subject to change.

Dr Jon Brock

Science writings: Neuroscience, psychology, science publishing, open science, science communication

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