Independence Day in the USA

Celebrating Freedom in America, But Not for All

The founders’ original vision didn’t extend to everyone. For those left behind, we need to finish the job

Kathleen Murphy
Minds Without Borders
6 min readJun 25, 2024

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Image generated by the author using Freepik

In 1776, during the beginning of the American Revolution, Thomas Jefferson penned his noble vision, which said in part: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”

The idea was groundbreaking. It meant ordinary people could have a say in how their government would function. If anyone rose to power, it would be through their hard work and talent, not through their birthright.

Jefferson’s idea was transformative. But as it turned out, it was hardly all-inclusive.

Left behind: African Americans

At the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, slaves were considered only 60 percent of a person. In 1852, in a keynote address at a July 4 celebration, the famous abolitionist Frederick Douglass delivered a scathing attack on American slavery.

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Kathleen Murphy
Minds Without Borders

Health writer and essayist offering insights into physical and emotional wellness and successful aging. Subscribe: https://kathleenamurphy.medium.com/subscribe