Who do you trust?

Gérard Mclean
May 12, 2018 · 3 min read

When Steve Jobs died, I knew about it a few minutes afterward because I saw a tweet from Chris Brogan asking if it were true. But I didn’t immediately retweet or reply; I went to nytimes.com. And cnn.com. And msnbc.com. And apple.com.

I also turned on my television and tuned to CNN. (They tend to break in with confirmed news fastest, though not always.)

When twitter gets it right, the pundits all point to the powers of social media, how they are scooping traditional journalism and why print and television is dying. When twitter gets it wrong, everyone has a good laugh and points to how silly and lemming-like twitter is.

Thank God we have some smart journalists at the control switch who can pull the handbrake on this runaway ham sandwich, they remark.

We continue to assess truthiness based on hit volume and forget that only one small child actually had the guts to say the emperor wasn’t wearing any clothes. According to the Google and Klout (and ABC for print) analytics, only the most viewed and recommended links are trustworthy even if only one small child or one barking dog says otherwise and in the end, turns out to be correct.

It all boils down to: Who do you trust?

We sometimes forget that Twitter and Facebook are commercial products and they have an agenda. This agenda may or may not be aligned with the users’. As Liz Heron of the New York Times remarks, “It’s helpful to have a journalist still.” (the video went missing, but I’ll find it….)

Even liars have to get you to trust them or the whole game is off.

That is what Rupert Murdoch understood when he shuttered News of the World. Readers didn’t mind being lied to as long as he had their trust. FOX News understands this as well. That is why they spend so much of their time with phrases such as “Fair and Balanced and “No Spin Zone.” Their news day cycle consists of a slow building of “evidence” for their eventual “news” presentation in the evening.

Rush Limbaugh does the same thing by going through a formula of “logical” presentation of the story. He contorts a nuanced story into a blatantly simple ipso facto argument that basically says, “Trust me, I’ve thought all this out, here is the trail of evidence and here is the simple conclusion.”

At the end of the day, however, it boils down to, “do you trust me?” If the answer is “Yes,” then you believe your source.

This story was originally posted at DogWalkBlog.com on November 1, 2011. If you need to check the primary source because, while you may trust me, you also want to verify stuff yourself. I like that about you.

The video is no longer on line, but I’m on a quest to find it. It’s important. Below is the opening session of the Journalism Interactive Conference at the University of Maryland, “Social Media: Best Practice in Journalism.” The link is at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/18160056in case the embed does’t work. The folks on the panel are Jim Long, Lynn Sweet and Liz Heron moderated by Adam Ostrow. It is probably the most succinct piece on social media for journalism I’ve seen yet. No grandiosity, no hyperbole, no silver bullet solutions. These folks have thought deeply about the issue and it shows. It is an hour long, but worth the listen.

Monkey with a loaded typewriter

Essays from life, mostly true.

Monkey with a loaded typewriter

Essays from life, mostly true. Buy the book and get all the essays in one place, no batteries required. Unless you buy it on Kindle, then you’re on your own. Sorry. http://amzn.to/1xxlLZB

Gérard Mclean

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Picking my brain will cost you a fortune. No discounts. Author; Monkey with a Loaded Typewriter http://amzn.to/1xxlLZB @rivershark @gerardmclean everywhere.

Monkey with a loaded typewriter

Essays from life, mostly true. Buy the book and get all the essays in one place, no batteries required. Unless you buy it on Kindle, then you’re on your own. Sorry. http://amzn.to/1xxlLZB