Lexis, Semiotics and Taxonomy for an efficient Information Architecture

DevSnack #18: Good design is not only the appearance but the functionality of a product. Words communicate meaning, so first we have to define the basics. An efficient architecture is a consistency between lexis, semiotics, and taxonomy.

This is our curated summary of IA for being aware of the rules and avoiding most common mistakes. Also, we’ve included a bonus track of the great case study of CNN’s Architecture for their Responsive Website Project.

#1 — Top 10 Information Architecture Mistakes
Bad information architecture causes the majority of outright user failures and isn’t improving at the rate of other web usability issues. To determine why, the article identifies 10 long-term sore thumbs that together cost websites billions of dollars each year.

Jakob Nielsen, Don Norman, Tog, and colleagues: usability advocates offering evidence-based user experience (UX) research, training, consulting.
Twitter: @NNgroup

#2 — On Taxonomy
Understanding the medium you are working on and the amount you can push things taxonomically is a critical lens to bring early in any structural work.

Abby Covert is an independent Information Architect.

#3 — Eight Principles of Information Architecture

This is a theoretical framework — a guideline based on universal truths that provides a sketch of what makes any information architecture good.

Dan Brown is a digital Product Designer @eightshapes.

#4 — A visual vocabulary for describing information architecture and interaction design
Diagrams are an essential tool for communicating information architecture and interaction design. This document discusses a common symbology for diagramming information architecture and interaction design concepts. It also provides guidelines for the use of these elements.

Jesse James Garrett is a Human experience designer. Co-founded Adaptive Path. Wrote The Elements of User Experience.

#5 — Object-Oriented UX
For the first time in history, CNN.com was releasing a responsive experience. This is a fantastic, expense and greatly well documented, case of study about reframing interface elements and hierarchy to prioritize a great UX on mobile devices.

Sofia Vovchehovski was tasked with designing the user experience of election night, while working at CNN.