MotionWerk
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MotionWerk

The crypto-emobility company

Transportation, electric vehicles, charging stations, representation of an e-mobility ecosystem

Our trajectory so far

MotionWerk is a company that was born initially to incubate and nurture the first steps of its opera prima: Share&Charge. For those who don’t know this initiative, you can read its blog to know more on how we evolved from an early idea (a marketplace for sharing charging stations, the “AirBnB of EV charging”) to what is currently being developed (a “decentralized protocol for Electric Vehicle charging, transactions and data sharing”) under the supervision of the Share&Charge Foundation.

These last months we have been busy factoring out Share&Charge from MotionWerk, to give the latter its own administrative body. Today, this Foundation has just started its activities outside the day-to-day operations of our company, although we will still remain as the primary software development provider, in order to provide a smooth transition for all different areas like product management, business development, or marketing.

Once we finished with this separation process, we have had to give it a thought on MotionWerk’s future. From big questions such as “what do we want to achieve” or “where do we want to go”, down to more pragmatic ones like what products and/or services we want to build, or the activities for the business models and use cases we need to tackle. We knew that beyond Share&Charge, there is still an e-mobility market — driven by the electric vehicle revolution — that is growing exponentially, holds a promising future for many players in this business, and is hungry for solutions. There is a blue ocean to be explored with the electrification of the transportation industry and we want to conquer it with innovation and entrepreneurial attitude.

A mission ahead

If we look back on our trajectory, over these two first years we have been mixing together two industries that are yet in their infancies: e-mobility and crypto-related technologies (sometimes called “blockchain” technologies). For the former, we specifically have been focused on solving the challenges in EV charging (e.g. roaming, interoperability); regarding the crypto space, we have used smart contracts, token designs and all kind of techniques from the so-called Web3 movement to create a protocol and a sort of software stack built specifically for the different stakeholders, like Charge Point Operators (CPO) or Mobility Service Providers (MSP).

While many startups and projects like Share&Charge are trying to disrupt the industry by providing protocols to build upon — most in a centralized manner but also with some others trying decentralised approaches— we asked ourselves: why can’t we tackle this mission of delivering charging services on a more holistic way, i.e. taking into consideration every part of the whole process by creating a complete e-mobility company? By using existing open standards from the charging industry and combining them with emerging technologies (specially the ones that solve scalability like second layer solutions), we could create truly end-to-end products and services, leveraging to the maximum the User eXperience (UX) of charging (e.g. discover, settle, pay) for EV drivers. In the same way, those who are on the other side, like the ones operating the Charge Points (CP), could make use of our software to boost their business goals through the rising adoption of electric transportation.

Our identity

In order to win the hearts of EV drivers and every other participant in this market, we agreed on assumptions, definitions, intentions and claims that ultimately knit the basis of what MotionWerk is (and is not). For starters, we don’t want to be simply a boutique, a software factory, a software consulting firm or a “blockchain” company. We want to become the e-mobility company that takes charging to the speed of light and helps bringing electric vehicles to hyper-growth in this business opportunity that today looks hard to spot, but for which we foresee a bright future. While some stakeholders are competing for the scarcity of resources (e.g. deployment of charging infrastructure over the geography) or building the best features, MotionWerk will work on making its software ubiquitous in our transition towards electrification, hand in hand with digitalization. We are inspired by disrupting companies that dream big and are not scared of trying out innovative ideas, and we firmly believe the opportunity for first movers will end up in a winner-takes-all situation, so the clock is ticking!

If any of this sound interesting to you and want to know more, please contact us. In the upcoming weeks we will start rolling out a bunch of new, exciting projects!

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The eMobility Company from the Future — MotionWerk takes EV charging interoperability to the speed of light. We innovate in the field of e-mobility by making our software solutions ubiquitous across the entire industry.

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Hector Garcia

Hector Garcia

Serial entrepreneur, Python hacker, Crypto enthusiast. Head of Innovation at TravelgateX.com, co-founder of Facturedo.com. I am a catalan.

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