And so their scars turned to gold

The Museum of Portable Sound’s Cristina Sousa Martínez interviews Mexican artist Ana Paula Santana about her upcoming sound art installation Resiliencia.

Image: Ana Paula Santana (www.instagram.com/anafauna) | Editing: Cristina Sousa Martínez

it has two attributes: first, there is the obvious one, the psychological, because there is this need for change and overcoming the sinister and on the other hand, there is a political impulse, a political change, why? Because if more than 3% of women dare to file complaints, the national security agenda would pay more attention to solving the problem and… well, we live in Mexico, but let’s imagine that things work.

Image: Ana Paula Santana (www.instagram.com/anafauna) | Editing: Cristina Sousa Martínez

It was a very emotional moment, they were all holding their pieces while the other was breaking hers and the idea was that they placed it at the height of their hearts and that they only let them go. Crash! They were not violent fractures (…). The rupture sound, as we were doing it all in a room that had tiles on the floor, was so loud that it was painful to us all.

Image: Ana Paula Santana (www.instagram.com/anafauna) | Editing: Cristina Sousa Martínez
Image: Ana Paula Santana (www.instagram.com/anafauna) | Editing: Cristina Sousa Martínez

Sound Beyond Music

The Museum of Portable Sound Magazine

Cristina Sousa Martínez

Written by

Londoner, from Xalapa (MX). Inconstant writer and art obsessed. Here, I write in broken English.

Sound Beyond Music

The Museum of Portable Sound Magazine