Nothing special | 985

My Author Journey, Saturday, July 8, 2017

# 985 (countdown)

I have nothing special to say today.

I assume I have nothing special to say today.

I assume the thing I have to say today is not special and will not be special.

I assume what I have to say today will be boring to people.

I assume what I have to say today will not be liked by people.

I assume. I assume. I assume.

Assuming doesn’t equal knowing.

Thus…

I don’t know if I have something special to say today.

I don’t know if the thing I have to say today is special or will be special.

I don’t know if the thing I have to say today will be boring to people.

I don’t know if the thing I have to say today will be liked by people.

Thus…

I might have something special to say today.

The thing I have to say today might be special or might become special.

The thing I have to say today might be interesting.

The thing I have to say today might be liked by people.

Thus…

Why not just share it?

Assumptions are necessary. In order to meet the other person (have a shot at meeting her) I need to assume that the person I’m about to meet today will make it to our meeting and so I get ready, leave my house, and go to the meeting.

I take action because I made an assumption. Of course I can also assume that the person will not make it to the meeting (will have some kind of an emergency on that day, or on her way to the meeting a car will hit her, etc.). These are very unfortunate, but not impossible scenarios. However very few people will assume that the other person will never make it to the meeting. Most will assume that the meeting will happen, they will get ready, leave the house and head to the meeting.

But assumptions are also unnecessary. They cripple us. Whenever we’re trying to predict people’s reactions (to something we’re about to say or do) we usually assume that the outcome will not be favorable or that what is on our minds / what we have to share is stupid/ dull/ unworthy of people’s attention. And we stop.

We stop before they even had the chance to tell us what they think/ whether they like it or not/ whether it brought them any value or not/ or whether they accept our offer.

In other words we reject ourselves before others get the chance to reject us. Before we get the chance to get rejected.

And if you think about it, the real rejections (the situations when other people reject us) are pretty rare. The vast majority of rejections happens in our own heads — when we tell ourselves that we have nothing special to say/ that we’re not good enough (because when you were 7 your mother, who by the way is not in the music business and never was in the music business, told you that you don’t have the voice for singing)/ or that we will be rejected or ridiculed by everybody.

Sure, some people will laugh, some people will ridicule, and some people will tell you the same thing your mother told you when you were 7 years old and tell you that you’re wasting your time and should do something else.

Heck, it’s possible that the majority of people will do that!

But some won’t. Some will like it. Some will want more of it. Some will find value in it.

Thus…

Share! Share regardless of what you think about it. Especially when you assume that it’s stupid/ dull/ unworthy of people’s attention, when you assume that nobody will want to read this article or hear to this piece of music.

Always share!

Reading. Zero.

Listening to audio:

Cure: A Journey into the Science of Mind over Body by Jo Marchant (15 min; on audible app)

Movies. Zero.

Videos on YouTube. Zero.

Progress on my second book. Zero.

My today’s answers on Quora:

Answer to Is it too late to follow your passion at 27?

Answer to What kind of careers can you have after economics?

Answer to Is “following your passion” a waste of time?

Music for this writing session: Tessa by Steve Jablonsky (on spotify). Definitely one of my favorite pieces of music when I’m writing. I test different artists and categories and I always (I mean always recently) go back to Tessa by Steve Jablonsky.