What Rules?

No one knows the rules. Understanding that is freeing.

When you think about it, it’s a problem of insecurity.

Experience brings with it a level of authority and understanding that is not possessed by the novice. But the novice can become an authority with intentional practice and time. That’s the only guarantee.

World-class ability in some activity or pursuit is never guaranteed. For example, if you are short in stature you can become good in basketball, but at the same time you will never be able to compete against the unusually tall players of the NBA. But that doesn’t mean that we should limit our interests. That shorter person who is highly interested in basketball can use their skills and knowledge obtained through hours and hours of play throughout the years to become a coach or to write about basketball, or involved in some way. After all, the game is the game. The game is the goal.

We can get paid for what we want to do, our own pursuits and dreams, but the real reward is our ability to improve time after time of putting effort forward.

While no one knows the rules, everyone knows that this is a guarantee.

It is a hard truth to understand that not everyone wants to do the work. Work by definition is not enjoyed.

We do, on the other hand, enjoy the results of that work. The feeling of accomplishment that comes from achieving a goal or finishing a project is a something different; it is special and should be difficult to obtain. We need the chase. We need to know that there is something out there that we can create. While we might not have the skills to do it at this time, we will at a future date — if we just keep trying.

No one knows the rules, and that means we can make them.

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