My Creative Corner
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My Creative Corner

All shades of gray disappearing

We all enjoy books, right? But you might not have noticed the details and demarcations made in your favourite reads.

Why is good and evil so deeply etched into the books of time? From The Lord of the Rings to Percy Jackson, here’s the deets on all.

Let’s start with the starting. Take the Ramayana for example. Why is there always, in every version, a good prince and a bad ruler? Ravan’s actions were justifiable, as he kidnapped Sita because Ram and Lakshman had mutilated Shurpnakha. Isn’t keeping your sister’s reputation and interests in mind the work of a good man? People used to say that the side of the Pandavas was the good side, in the Mahabharat. The Kauravas were the evil people. But, in retrospect, even the Pandavas had committed familicide. That’s not justifiable. Neither was the cheer-haran of Draupadi, but that does not allow the Kauravas to become devils, and the Pandavas to become victimised angels.

Moving on, the 20th century. The Lord of the Rings, and later books of the 21st century, like Harry Potter, had clearly drawn battle lines between the Dark Lords and the protagonists. Why is that?

To finish off, I would like to quote, “One’s man’s meat is another’s poison.”

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Agastya Sharma

Agastya Sharma

A random nerd who reviews books and movies, and travels way too much.