Worlds collide as ICE takes on Rentboy.com

The legalization of marijuana in Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and Washington, DC, and the de facto legalization of marijuana in some medical-marijuana states, resulted from a detente between those states and federal enforcement agencies. There are bigger fish to fry, presumably. (Alternately, this is sanctuary-city madness.)

Now Obama’s Department of Homeland Security, specifically its law-enforcement arm, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, has cracked down on the biggest terrorist threat to our American lifestyle: Rentboy.com.

Yes, the Times story, online at least, is headed by an image of federal enforcement officers hauling out what I pray are bottles of poppers and lube in Homeland Security evidence boxes.

Headed “Raid of Rentboy, an Escort Website, Angers Gay Activists,” the article by Stephanie Clifford quotes Justin Vivian Bond, “a performer and an activist who is transgender”: “To many in our community this feels like a throwback to when the police raided gay bars in the ’50s and ’60s.”

Well, only to the geriatric set, and even there, not really. This is not hauling fags before the Klieg lights and doing Michelangelo Signorile proud. It’s an embarrassment, yes, but to DHS, responsible for managing and enforcing the immigration system; securing the transport of money, goods, and travelers; and to build on that last point, information, aka cybersecurity.

The article tells us, “Escorts … posted ads including penis size, pay rate and preferred fetishes, and the site’s visitors then contacted them directly.” So that’s all evidence now.

I’m fairly certain people are going to have sex. In a capitalist society, sometimes currency will be exchanged for another’s pleasure. Those coerced into this, and human trafficking, are of great concern to those who care about justice.

But is that at the heart of the criminal enterprise here, or did Rentboy.com violate a more puritanical morality? Whose justice and security is ICE serving? Why?


Originally published at www.scifibridges.com on August 27, 2015.