My Selection
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My Selection

My Selection — That Terrible Halloween Night

James Stevenson’s picture book is a treat for all seasons

Cover of “That Terrible Halloween Night” / Credit: HarperCollins

James Stevenson was best known as a New Yorker cartoonist who elegantly sent up starchy doctors, lawyers, and other upper middle class Americans.

But Stevenson also wrote children’s books that won raves from critics, librarians, and young readers. Two of his most entertaining tales appear in his picture…

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“All good books are the same and when you read a good book you realize it’s already passed on to you and then that book becomes yours whatever good or bad or enjoyable in it. There are evils, sadness, people, towns and seasons there, they all become yours.” (Ernest Hemingway)

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Janice Harayda

Janice Harayda

Critic, novelist, award-winning journalist. Former book columnist for Glamour and book editor of The Plain Dealer.

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