Chinese groups to improve AC efficiency from 2018–2020

The Energy Foundation China (EFC) and the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program China (K-CEP China) yesterday launched a program to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners which will run for two years.

By Charlotte McLaughlin

China-based groups the Energy Foundation China (EFC) and the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program China (K-CEP China) yesterday launched a program to reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial air conditioning.

The K-CEP and EFC project will focus on developing energy-efficiency standards and labels In China from 2018 to 2020.

China is the world’s largest manufacturer of cooling equipment, producing over 130 million room air conditioners with a 70% global market share. Reducing energy consumption can therefore have a positive impact on a global scale, according to K-CEP.

Air conditioning is already putting a strain on energy demand in many countries.

“Air conditioning accounts for around 30% of current and forecasted summer load in warm climates (for example in California, US); and from 40–60% of the total load in hot climates on summer days in metropolitan areas (such as Delhi, India),” according to a report written by UN Environment.

K-CEP China is part of the wider K-CEP initiative that includes 18 foundations that have committed USD 52 million to help developing countries transition to energy-efficient cooling.

The EFC, a sustainable energy group, will work with Chinese government agencies, research institutes, and air-conditioner manufacturers to improve cooling efficiency and promote green products, echoing China’s commitment to a greener economy, according to Zou Ji, EFC president.

The National Development and Reform Commission is a national research organisation conducting comprehensive studies on China’s energy issues. It receives grants from the EFC, and will team up with other groups this year to track local usage of environmentally friendly products to promote production and procurement of green equipment, according to Wang Shancheng, a senior official at the NDRC (China’s top economic planner).

Originally published Jan 26, 2018:

Related news:

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.