The 3 Ways Nestlé is Building a Better Workplace for LGBTQ Employees Like Me

From equal benefits to employee engagement — here’s how my company puts inclusion at its core

David Fox
David Fox
Mar 28 · 6 min read

1. Building Employee Engagement and Advocacy from the Ground Up

Nestlé would not be able to make significant steps forward in inclusion policies without listening to the people it matters to most. To drive change from the ground-up, we’ve founded company-supported Employee Engagement Groups like the LGBTQ and Allies Network, where my colleagues and I lead conversations about how Nestlé can improve further. Right now the network is looking at opportunities to be more involved in Pride events in the DC area in 2019, and exploring local organizations where we can volunteer to help LGBTQ folks in the community who need support.


2. Providing Equal Benefits for Married Couples or those in Domestic Partnerships

When Nestlé moved its U.S. headquarters from California to Arlington, Virginia I knew I wanted to make the move cross country with the company and my husband, Luke, agreed that we should commit to the relocation.

Luke and I on our wedding day

3. Respecting LGBTQ Parents with the Same Benefits as Straight Parents

In 2015 Nestlé launched a progressive Parent Support Policy, which provides 14 weeks of paid leave for the primary caregiver of a newborn with an option to extend with 12 weeks unpaid leave. When they say primary caregiver, they mean any primary caregiver, regardless of gender or sexuality: biological parents, adoptive parents, foster parents, and spouses or domestic partners with primary responsibility for caring for a child.

Explore the data from the first two years of the Parent Support Policy


Nestle.USA

Enhancing quality of life and contributing to a healthier future in the U.S.

Thanks to Liz Caselli-Mechael.

David Fox

Written by

David Fox

Human Resources Manager and Chair of @NestleUSA’s LGBTQ and Allies Network.

Nestle.USA

Enhancing quality of life and contributing to a healthier future in the U.S.