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How to Configure RIP Routing Protocol on Juniper and Cisco Routers

In this simple lab will show how to configure RIP routing protocol on Juniper and Cisco routers.

R1 is a Cisco router, J1 and J2 are Juniper routers.

Let’s starting from J1 :

Assign IP address to each interfaces: IP 172.28.1.3/24 on interface ge-0/0/0 that connected to R1, 172.28.2.3/24 on interface ge-0/0/1, and 1.1.1.1/32 for IP loopback interface.

[edit]
root@J1# set interfaces ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 172.28.1.3/24
[edit]
root@J1# set interfaces ge-0/0/1 unit 0 family inet address 172.28.2.3/24
[edit]
root@J1# set interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet address 1.1.1.1/32

Now tell the router what interfaces will participate in RIP, and we have to give the process an identifier, here we call it RIP-LAB.

[edit]
root@J1# edit protocols rip
[edit protocols rip]
root@J1# set group RIP-LAB neighbor ge-0/0/0.0
[edit protocols rip]
root@J1# set group RIP-LAB neighbor ge-0/0/1.0

Junos requires the use of policy-statements to advertise routes. The default for RIP is to accept all learn routes from neighbors, but reject exporting them to neighbors unless there is a policy that permits it.

Now we will create a policy called RIP-POLICY and allow routes from the RIP protocol to be passed.

[edit]
root@J1# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 from protocol rip

And also direct attached network (loopback interface) be passed.

[edit]
root@J1# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 from protocol direct

Finally here’s the term that means that they can pass.

[edit]
root@J1# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 then accept

Now we have a policy-statement, we now need to apply that to the protocol RIP and to RIP group RIP-LAB.

edit]
root@J1# edit protocols rip
[edit protocols rip]
root@J1# set group RIP-LAB export RIP-POLICY

Now move to J2.

We configure J2 with the same steps :

[edit]
root@J2# set interfaces ge-0/0/0 unit 0 family inet address 172.28.2.2/24
[edit]
root@J2# set interfaces lo0 unit 0 family inet address 2.2.2.2/32
[edit]
root@J2# commit
[edit]
root@J2# edit protocols rip
[edit protocols rip]
root@J2# set group RIP-LAB neighbor ge0/0/0.0
[edit]
root@J2# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 from protocol rip
[edit]
root@J2# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 from protocol direct
[edit]
root@J2# set policy-options policy-statement RIP-POLICY term 1 then accept
[edit protocols rip]
root@J2# set group RIP-LAB export RIP-POLICY

Don’t forget “commit” after finishing the configuration.

The last, let’s move to R1 the Cisco router.

R1(config)#interface e0/0
R1(config-if)#ip address 172.28.1.2 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if)#no shut
R1(config)#interface loopback 0
R1(config-if)#ip address 3.3.3.3 255.255.255.255
R1(config-if)#no shut
R1(config)#router rip
R1(config-router)#ver 2
R1(config-router)#network 172.28.1.0
R1(config-router)#network 3.3.3.3
R1(config-router)#passive-interface loopback 0
R1(config-router)#no auto-summary

Now let’s check the routing table from R1.

R1#sh ip route rip
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
a - application route
+ - replicated route, % - next hop override
Gateway of last resort is not set1.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 1.1.1.1 [120/1] via 172.28.1.3, 00:00:00, Ethernet0/0
2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 2.2.2.2 [120/2] via 172.28.1.3, 00:00:00, Ethernet0/0
172.28.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
R 172.28.2.0/24 [120/1] via 172.28.1.3, 00:00:00, Ethernet0/0

We can see loopback of J1 (1.1.1.1) and J2 (2.2.2.2) advertised by RIP.
Now try to ping 2.2.2.2.

R1#ping 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 213/446/1009 ms

Great! Ping to 2.2.2.2 is OK.

Now let’s take a look from J2.

[edit]
root@J2# run show route table inet.0
inet.0: 7 destinations, 7 routes (7 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden)
+ = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both
1.1.1.1/32 *[RIP/100] 00:07:46, metric 2, tag 0
> to 172.28.2.3 via ge-0/0/0.0
2.2.2.2/32 *[Direct/0] 00:25:40
> via lo0.0
3.3.3.3/32 *[RIP/100] 00:00:14, metric 3, tag 0
> to 172.28.2.3 via ge-0/0/0.0
172.28.1.0/24 *[RIP/100] 00:07:46, metric 2, tag 0
> to 172.28.2.3 via ge-0/0/0.0
172.28.2.0/24 *[Direct/0] 00:25:40
> via ge-0/0/0.0
172.28.2.2/32 *[Local/0] 00:25:40
Local via ge-0/0/0.0
224.0.0.9/32 *[RIP/100] 00:10:55, metric 1
MultiRecv
[edit]
root@J2# run ping 3.3.3.3 rapid
PING 3.3.3.3 (3.3.3.3): 56 data bytes
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
--- 3.3.3.3 ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, +210 duplicates, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 273.255/1312.453/2069.859/456.302 ms

J2 can see R1’s loopback (3.3.3.3) and ping result is OK.

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Anggara

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