The Tilt
Published in

The Tilt

The Art Corner: ‘The future is the saddest thing’

A conversation with Alisa Gorshenina on imagination, surrealism, ritual and resistance in Russia at war.

Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.
Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.
Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.
Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.

Alisa’s protective principles around her work have put her at odds with a mainstream cultural scene in Russia that often exhibits an extractive, hyper-commercial attitude to artwork.

This project was inspired by Alisa’s fantasties around the possibilities, given her Turkic roots, that she could be the distant relative of Tamerlan, the legendary Turko-Mongol leader. But as Alisa explains, in reality,

Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.

“We have a sad reality here in Russia…art does not influence the government; if anything it just annoys it.”

“With time I will age”, Alisa says. “My own bodily form won’t be the way it is now. Now, I work with this body and my artwork. Later, I will be changing, I’m already changing. It’s important for me, that over the course of my life, the association between my artworks is between them and me.” To lose them would be losing parts of her.

Courtesy of Alisa Goreshina.

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exploring the world of rights, social justice, feminisms, storytelling, and narrative change.

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Daniel Voskoboynik

Researcher, artist, and campaigner. Passionate about systems thinking, climate justice, intersectionality, and poetry.