LETTER

A “Historic Week” on Nightingale

Well, historic in the sense that we published some amazing history-themed content.

Isaac Levy-Rubinett
Feb 14 · 2 min read

Olivia Vane wrote “Strange Times: Visualising the Oddities of Time Data” which builds upon her experience visualizing museum collections and dives into the unique challenges of working with historic objects and data. So often, temporal data is inexact, uncertain, or inaccurate, which raises tricky questions for practitioners. This article covers some of these situations as well as the strategies designers can take to either conceal or expose gaps in data.

Attila Bátorfy analyzed political cartoons from communist-era postwar Hungary in “The Imperialist Dogs Bark, But The Communist Graph Goes On.” Charts were an important part of the communist regime, used as data-based evidence of skyrocketing production and efficient social programs, and they were a powerful tool for information warfare between the communist government and its enemies.

Additionally, Nightingale was proud to publish an excerpt from Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein’s upcoming book, Data Feminism, about two different maps of Detroit. One map stems from the racist and discriminatory practice of Redlining, and the other, “Where Commuters Run Over Black Children on the Pointes-Downtown Track,” was created by community members to shed light on the city’s inequality.

Where these pieces look back at historical moments in time, Stephen Spiewak’s piece looks back on a timeless moment: Super Bowl LIV. When it comes to Super Bowl tickets, price is probably the first data point you’ll want to know. But if we look deeper, there’s a hidden data point that can tell a much more compelling story. At Vivid Seats, they’ve developed a metric that has accurately predicted the last five Super Bowl winners based on ticket sales.

One of the main goals of looking to the past is understanding where we are headed. So naturally, Allen Hillery’s ongoing series on the future of BI was a fitting way to close the week. Allen spoke with Duncan Clark, the founder of Flourish, about his winding career path, data journalism vs. data storytelling, and Talkies!

As always, if you are interested in writing for Nightingale, please contact one of our editors or write to us at pitchnightingale@gmail.com. We are always looking for new writers and open to exploring new ideas, and we encourage you to get in touch!

Nightingale

The Journal of the Data Visualization Society

Isaac Levy-Rubinett

Written by

managing editor for Nightingale

Nightingale

The Journal of the Data Visualization Society

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