The Seer Gif Series

Jainism /ˈdʒeɪnɪz(ə)m/ Interesting facts about Paul Jaisini

The name Jaisini has no relevance to what is known as Jainism the ancient religion.

The three dots above the swastika represent the three jewels of Jainism: Samyak Darshan (Right Faith), Samyak Jnan (Right Knowledge), and Samyak Charitra (Right Conduct). We should have all three: right knowledge, right faith, and right conduct together, then only can we achieve the liberation. The right knowledge means having the knowledge that soul and body are separate and that the soul, not the body attains the salvation. The right faith means one must have faith in what is told by Jinas, who were omniscient. The right conduct means that our actions should be void of attachment and hatred.

4th dot

At the very top part of the Jain Universe symbol is a small curved arc. This arc represents the abode of the Siddhas. It is known as the Siddhashila. It is the final resting place of the liberated souls. The dot represents a siddha. In order to achieve this stage, a soul must destroy…


Paul Jaisini The 4th Dot Swastica of Jainism जैन धर्म

Jainism /ˈdʒeɪnɪz(ə)m/, traditionally known asJaina Shasana orJaina dharma(Sanskrit: जैन धर्म),[1] is a nontheistic Indian religion that prescribes a path of ahimsa -nonviolence — towards all living beings, and emphasizes spiritual independence and equality between all forms of life.

Practitioners believe that nonviolence and self-control are the means by which they can obtain liberation. Currently Jainism is divided into two major sects, Śvētāmbara andDigambara.

The word Jainism is derived from the Sanskrit verb root jin (“to conquer”). It refers to a battle with the passions and bodily pleasures that the Jain ascetics undertake. Those who win this battle are termed as Jina (conqueror). The term Jaina is therefore used to refer to laymen and ascetics of this tradition alike.

Jainism is a religious minority in India, with 4.2 million adherents, and there are small but notable immigrant communities in Belgium,Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and the United States.

Jainism is one of the oldest religions in the world. Jains traditionally trace their history through a succession of twenty-four propagators of their faith known as tirthankaras with Rishabha as the first and Mahāvīra as the last of the current era.

For long periods of time, Jainism was the state religion of Indian kingdoms and widely adopted in the Indian subcontinent. The religion has been in decline since the 8th century AD due to the growth of, and oppression by the followers of Hinduism and Islam.

The origins of Jainism are obscure.
Doctrine One of the most important and fundamental doctrines of Jainism is anēkāntavāda. It refers to the principles of pluralism and multiplicity of viewpoints, and to the notion that truth and reality are perceived differently from diverse points of view, no single one of which is complete . Jains contrast all attempts to proclaim absolute truth with this theory, which can be illustrated through the parable of the blind men and an elephant. In this story, each blind man feels a different part of an elephant: its trunk, leg, ear, and so on. All of them claim to understand and explain the true appearance of the elephant but, due to their limited perspectives, can only partly succeed.