Daily Bread

Recordings, notes and application questions

Each week, we produce notes, discussion points and application questions for the Sunday talks — helping you go deeper into everything we’re looking at together and resourcing our Small Groups during the week. Use the embedded player to listen to the talk, or click here to visit Soundcloud and download it on a PC. You can also find the accompanying Powerpoint presentation here.

Key Passages

  • Matthew 6:5–13
  • Exodus 16:1–5/13–25/35
  • Deuteronomy 8:2–5
  • Proverbs 30:8–9

Notes

The term ‘daily bread’ had immediate associations with Gods action amongst, and provision for, His people throughout Israel’s history (especially manna in the desert in Exodus 16).

Through this passage, echoed in the Lord’s prayer, we see that:

  • God is mindful of both our physical and spiritual needs
  • Our physical needs are not unimportant. They are known to God.
  • God’s provision is closely connected to our learning contentedness and submission to His perfect, good, Fatherly Will for us. (Deuteronomy 8:3)
  • There is a difference between what we need and what we want
  • God’s physical provision has our spiritual wellbeing in mind (See Prov 30:8–9)
  • God sets limits that free us from comparisons with others / past circumstances / future hopes. Daily bread is for living in the present, within the limits of this 24 hours.

Learning to pray for our ‘daily bread’ (just enough for each day) enables us to receive from God the gift of rest and freedom from tireless and wearisome toil. God’s provision is not individualistic but communal. The Lord’s prayer is not ‘me’ and ‘my’ but ‘us’ and ‘our.’ This forms us into people looking outside of ourselves.

Praying for daily bread forms us, therefore, into those:

  • That trust God for our holistic needs
  • That learn contentedness as we acknowledge we have a good Father who knows what we really need better than us
  • That are able to rest, that can be present in the moment, and that can be turned out towards others not caught up in self.

Application Questions

  1. What spoke to you most from Sunday’s Sermon?
  2. What needs do you current have? How can we as a small group pray for them to be met?
  3. How willingly are you receiving the gift of rest each day?
  4. Do you find it easy to live in the present? How might we grow together in that kind of contentedness?
  5. How prone are you to making comparisons? What does this produce in you? How can you turn away from that way of living?
  6. What do you make of Proverbs 30:8–9? What does that tell us about the fragility of our hearts? How can we embrace that prayer as a means of growing in a childlike trust in the goodness of God?
  7. What needs do you see in our local community / nation / internationally? Spend some time praying into these needs, looking outside ourselves.