It’s Time To Beet It Up!

A beet carpaccio recipe that will make you rethink your relationship with the humble beetroot.

Beet Carpaccio, photo by author

Now I know, you are probably thinking “beets?! Why beets?!”

I know, I know…I definitely wasn’t a big fan of them when I was growing up and even into adulthood. However, as I’ve transitioned into a plant-based diet, I have really gained an appreciation for the versatility of beets.

Not to mention, beets are high in vitamins A and C, Iron, Folic Acid, Fiber as well as the amino acid, Glutamine. This makes beets great for maintaining intestinal health, lowering blood pressure, slowing dementia and much more.

If you don’t like beets, I challenge you to try this recipe, it might just change your mind.

Let’s get cooking!

Beet Carpaccio

Carpaccio is usually an Italian raw preparation of well-seasoned, thinly sliced beef. This type of preparation is not exclusive to Italian cuisine as the Japanese have a very similar preparation known as Tataki. I’ve had both of these dishes in my pre-plant-based life and I was particularly fond of Tataki. However, I love the sound of “Beet Carpaccio” and honestly, I thought it would be more recognizable to a broader cross section of people.

Regardless of what we call it, this dish is delicious and soooo easy to make!

Gather your ingredients

1–2 large beets

2 large cloves of garlic

Five spice powder

Agave syrup

Sea salt

Quick pickled ginger (optional)

Black pepper

Chives (dried or fresh)

Coconut oil (or your favorite dressing oil)

First things first…

Take a small sauce pan and fill it half way up with water. Add two pinches of sea salt to the water and let it come to a rapid boil.

While your water heats up, wash your beets thoroughly especially if you are leaving the skin on. I tend to leave the skin on because with these thin slices, it is not noticeable at all. If it bothers you, peel your beets.

Then, you are going to slice your beets as thinly as humanly possible. If you have a mandolin, this is the perfect time to use it. I don’t have one, so, I pulled out my sharpest knife and got as thin as I could. I was unable to get perfectly round slices, but that’s really not necessary for this dish anyway.

While you’re in a slicing state of mind, peel and thinly slice your garlic cloves. You are going to need them to garnish your carpaccio.

Into the pot

By the time you’ve finished slicing your beets, your water should be at a rapid boil. drop in your slices, spreading them out evenly in the pan so that they cook at around the same rate. Set your kitchen timer for two minutes and let them boil. They should be fork tender in that time because the slices are very thin.

Dress ’em up

Take your beets out of the pot and place on a plate. In a small bowl or container, mix your oil, a splash of agave, and five spice powder to taste. I would advise going rather light on the five spice because it can be quite aggressive, but it does add a nice beefy essence to the beets.

Drizzle the mixture on your beets and massage it in to each slice, crack some black pepper over the top and set aside. The longer your beets sit, the tastier they will be.

In the meantime, rinse out your sauce pan, add a tiny splash of oil and let heat up for one minute. Set your fire to low and drop in your garlic chips. You do NOT want to walk away from this because your garlic can burn in 2.5 seconds. Keep a constant eye, turn the garlic so that it gets evenly crisped on both sides and turn off the heat when the edges start to brown.

Drain your garlic chips on a piece of paper towel before using it to adorn your beets.

I took out one of my nice plates, carefully arranged my beets down the center of the plate and adorned it with my garnishes. I chose to do a quick pickled ginger, garlic chips and chives. I only had dried chives and they worked well.

If you too, like pickled ginger, thinly slice a small piece of fresh ginger, reserve a tiny bit of the liquid from your beets, add a dash of apple cider vinegar and submerge your ginger slices in it. As with any pickle, the longer you let it sit, the better. That said, I was pressed for time so, I took mine out after two minutes. It still did the job.

You can serve this as a salad alongside a meal or as a main attraction with a side of quinoa, fried rice, or an Asian noodle dish.

I hope you and your family enjoy this dish as much as I did!

Melissa writes on a plethora of topics ranging from politics, race, parenting, to surviving this thing called life. However, she is extremely passionate about food and food stories. If you like her recipes check out Recipe’d , her recent food writing project and follow it on Instagram @reciped_sub .

One Table, One World

People coming from different cultural backgrounds sharing…

Melissa A. Matthews

Written by

Contact me @ Mamltd@gmail.com

One Table, One World

People coming from different cultural backgrounds sharing seats at the table to dine, to laugh, to cook, to heal and most of all to share the stories of their unique journeys all over the world.

Melissa A. Matthews

Written by

Contact me @ Mamltd@gmail.com

One Table, One World

People coming from different cultural backgrounds sharing seats at the table to dine, to laugh, to cook, to heal and most of all to share the stories of their unique journeys all over the world.

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