Abiogenesis: The Great Delusion

Addressing the blind spot in the ‘beginning of life’ narrative

Leo Greenwood
Original Philosophy

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Photo by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases on Unsplash

Did life itself emerge? If so, what from? Primordial soup? Sounds tasty but it also sounds a bit… Aristotelean. Don’t get me wrong, Aristotle had a lot of great ideas, but he often had ideas that ‘haven’t aged well,’ we’ll say.

Like what?” you ask: Earth has been here for all eternity is one; men have more teeth than women; there are seven heavenly bodies that never change; some animals spontaneously come into being from mud; heavy objects fall faster than light objects — wait, go back one?

some animals spontaneously come into being from mud

Spontaneous Generation

This is the notion that life can arise from non-living matter. It’s called spontaneous generation, or, if you like, abiogenesis.

a- ‘without’ or ‘not’
bio — ‘life’
genesis — ‘origin’ or ‘birth’ [1]

In modern day English, ‘birth without [prior] life’.

Yes, someone having a load of bad ideas doesn’t mean they can’t also have really good ideas. For example, it’s possible that someone could believe the Earth is flat and still have exceptional parenting techniques for emotion regulation.

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Leo Greenwood
Original Philosophy

The Universe thinks about itself in interesting ways from here. Philosopher, author, in love with the miracle of existence. leogreenwood.com