Artificial Intelligence in Japan (R&D, Market and Industry Analysis)

OSA_DC
OSA_DC
Apr 4, 2018 · 39 min read
  • Business process improvement (logistics optimisation, workplace automation)
  • Predictive analysis and forecast. Japan Weather Association has partnered with retailers and food producers to develop a new AI-based system for predicting food demand. This association estimates that over 30 percent of industries are subject to weather-related risks. An AI system would be able to reduce some of Japan’s food waste problem. Nomura Securities has recently introduced a new AI-based stock trading system for institutional investors. The system makes assessments utilising vast amounts of price and trading data, and predicts how share prices will be trending.
  • Fraud detection (detecting irregular patterns)
  • Transport (driverless cars, driverless tractors). Kubota is developing an AI-based autonomous tractor for use in rice paddies that could raise the productivity when the farmers are greying.
  • Medicine (ability to analyse massive amounts of genomic data for better diagnosis, platforms for scanning medical literature and facilitating care management recommendations).
  • Control systems (elevator management optimisation through interpreting, predicting and monitoring).
  • Advertising. Scigineer, an Internet advertising service provider, has developed an AI-based recommendation engine, Deqwas, that precisely match the interests of each recipient.
  • Well-established system for after-sales service including follow-up and troubleshooting. Japanese companies and customers are very demanding when it comes to the after-sales service. This can be a challenge for European SMEs as the after-sales service in Japan tends to be costlier than in Europe.
  • Lack of local experienced talent well-versed in AI technologies and its applications. Japan has just started the race to catch up with the US and Europe. According to Nikkei Shimbun, there is a global lack of tens of thousands knowledgeable persons in the AI industry. This also holds for Japan and may negatively impact European SMEs planning to enter the AI segment in Japan.
  • Weak brand to offer. Many small European start-ups in the AI field are not yet well known with “weak” brands that may prolong the process to get into the Japanese market.
  • Insufficient AI regulatory framework in Japan. The AI industry is just about to take off and the regulatory framework is not on par with the current development stage of artificial intelligence in Japan. For European companies this may pose a challenge as it may be difficult to know the direction of forthcoming regulations as well as governmental policy preferences.
  • Cultural differences. Japan’s business culture is quite different compared to Europe and it may take some time to get a satisfactory understanding of important differences.
  • Start own subsidiary Considering the current status of the Japanese AI industry that lacks experienced talent, this option may be limited to products/solutions that do not have to be extensively localised.

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OSA DC is a decentralized, AI-driven blockchain platform that collects and analyzes data from retailers, manufacturers, consumers, and open data sources in real-time.

OSA_DC

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OSA_DC

Decentralized, AI-driven blockchain platform that collects and analyzes data from retailers, manufacturers, consumers, and open data sources in real time.

osadc

osadc

OSA DC is a decentralized, AI-driven blockchain platform that collects and analyzes data from retailers, manufacturers, consumers, and open data sources in real-time.