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How to see what Tezos NFTs someone owns

There’s nothing quite like a little envy to really get the emotional gears grinding and the credit card pulled out. Sometimes the grass really is greener on the other side, and you want that grass. At least, that’s been my experience, never mind the fact that envy is likely destroying the American Dream.

Maybe you just want to learn how someone grew their beautiful green grass. Understanding the collections of popular artists and collectors can, in fact, help you become a better collector. By taking a look at three things: the piece itself, the price it was acquired and the trading history, you can get an idea of the value attributed to certain pieces.

The below how-to can show you some of that. For this how-to, I’m going to help you take a look at some of the stuff that famed NFT artist Tim Maxwell has collected on Tezos.

How to find an NFT collector’s collection

The first step — where to look?

Clicking on Tim’s twitter profile, look right at his bio. Lo and behold, he’s got a link to himself on objkt.com. Looking at the photo, that appears to be the same person. (Be careful, though, always make sure you’re confident that you’re looking at the real profile.)

My boy Tim Maxwell. He doesn’t know I exist.

The first things you’ll see on this page are his creations. These are pieces that he, as an artist, has created and minted and is looking to sell. (Highly recommend bookmarking this page for future buying.) Recently, objkt.com rolled out a new feature allowing you to “follow” an artist or a collector and be notified of activity on their account.

Second step: See what he personally owns

In the tab menu click on “Owned”.

Click on “Owned”, yes, with your mouse.

Third step: Find a piece to dig into

He owns a pretty cool piece (at least he still owns it as of this writing) called “Middle Class” by Studio Brooke. Let’s look at that one. You can find it by searching “Middle Class”. Do that and click on it (or click on any one you want). That will land you on this page, showing the piece of art itself and other pertinent details.

Search for “Middle Class” or just click on one of them down there

Now you’re looking at that specific piece a bunch of information about it. But what did Tim pay for it? Let’s see!

Step 4: Get purchase price

At the bottom of the page, click on “History” to expand that section at the bottom, and filter for “Sale”.

This will filter in just the Sales themselves.

When you’ve done that, you’ll see all the sales of this piece, batched by date. Find Tim’s purchase by looking for his name, maxwellinked. Click on that little “link” to get to the transaction details.

Now we are going to see all the secrets. The public ones.

Now that you’re on this page, you’ll see the details of the transactions. Tim paid 20tez (how do you make the tezos logo?) for the piece, for about $60 USD. Boom.

20 bones.

That’s all there is to it. With this mighty power in hand you’ll be able to see what people have paid for pieces and understand the markup. As of this writing, the cheapest you could buy this piece from someone is around 70tez, so someone is profiting about 50tez minus fees and royalties. Not a bad shake. The next cheapest is on sale for 500tez. All the more reason to get in early and get in often.

For more educational materials, check us out at outli3rs.xyz.

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Outliers is an educational platform for NFTs. It’s the easiest way to learn and collect in Web3. Our unique curriculum, community and utilities will help you level up in a rapidly advancing world.

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John David Back

John David Back

Peanut butter first, code second.

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