First, just email me. Don’t call.

Second, I immediately look for two things in pitch emails:

  1. Have you addressed me by name?
  2. Have you shown some knowledge of my work – like, at the very least, the name of the company for which I work?

If the answer is “no” to the first question, I trash the email without opening it. If the answer is “no” to the second question, I trash it without reading it.

Third, keep your pitch short. I get a lot of emails and need to be able to process your pitch quickly. If it’s longer than a paragraph, I will likely take a long time to get back to you, if I do at all. Don’t get cute with it – just give me the one thing that makes your story unique and ask if I’d be interested in knowing more. If I think it’s worth further consideration, I’ll follow up.

Finally, I’m not particularly interested in fundraising or launch stories, but either of those events might provide a reasonable-enough excuse to write a wider story about a trend that your company is part of, an insight that challenges conventional thinking, or a conflict that places your company in an intriguing context. If you pitch me on the ideas that fit those descriptions, your chances of coverage will increase dramatically.