Trials to treatments: stem cells

We take a look at the science behind trials that aim to slow and reverse Parkinson’s by using stem cells or other cell therapies.

Dr Beckie Port
Sep 24, 2018 · 15 min read

Quick summary if you’re in hurry

The culture web by Dr Shi-Yu Yang, entry to Picturing Parkinson’s 2015

Early clinical trials of cell-based therapies

The potential of stem cells


The many types of stem cells

Making new brain cells


Current cell-therapy clinical trials

1. Giving stem cells outside of the brain

2. Transplanting brain cells collected from foetal tissue

“We are continuing to work on developing the next generation of stem cell therapies for Parkinson’s. If we can prove that transplants can work consistently for people with Parkinson’s, we’ll be able to move into trials with stem-cell derived nerve cells as quickly as possible.”

— Roger Barker, research lead on the TRANSEURO trial

3. Transplanting other types of brain cells

4. Transplanting stem cells into the brain

5. First transplant trial of lab made dopamine-producing brain cells



Enjoyed this blog? Read another from the trials to treatments series

Parkinson’s UK

Get the latest research news, discover more about Parkinson’s and read about how others are getting involved. For information and support, visit www.parkinsons.org.uk

Thanks to Claire Bale.

Dr Beckie Port

Written by

Research Communications Manager at @ParkinsonsUK. Ex-researcher in oncology and virology.

Parkinson’s UK

Get the latest research news, discover more about Parkinson’s and read about how others are getting involved. For information and support, visit www.parkinsons.org.uk