A VISIT TO LEKKI CONSERVATION CENTER

Thinking of where to spend your new year for relaxation and tour a visit to Lekki conservation will do, it has many interesting moment to catch. The most intriguing part of the center is the canopy walkway identified as the longest walkway in Africa.

Before I narrate my experience at the center, a brief description of the place will give us an insight to what it feels like. The reserve area which covers a land area of 78 hectare is located on Lekki Peninsula, next to the Lekki Lagoon, and near the Lagos Lagoon. It protects the wetlands of the Lekki peninsula which consists of swamp and Savannah habitats.

Approaching the reserve, there’s a boulevard of coconut trees which leads to a well laid out car and Visitors Park. It is endowed with an abundance of plant and animal life. Its huge tract of wetlands is set aside for wildlife viewing. Raised walkways enable viewing of animals like monkeys, crocodiles, snakes and various birds.

There is also a conservation center and a library. A trail boardwalk was constructed in 1992 to enrich tourists view of the vast resources of the nature reserve which is encapsulated on a mangrove terrain. Side attractions along the trail includes swamp outlook, bird hide, rest stops and the tree house. The 1.8km nature trail behind the foremost main buildings is connected by two wooden tracks. A sturdy wooden track leading to the nature trail, reveals an expansive stretch of marshland and savannah grassland teeming with wildlife, as well as rich aquatic flora and fauna.

I went to the conservation center in company of a group known as ML4S, entering in the conservation, we sited lot of animals like monkeys moving around the car park area, ostrich was another notable animal sited and many more. But sincerely I tell you that was my first time of seeing an ostrich and it looks so beautiful.

As we were waiting to go on tour around the conservation center we decided to put something in our stomach because it was an early morning journey. We were about to take our small chops when the people in charge of the conservation warned us not to feed any of the monkeys, we listen to this instruction but the monkeys will not let us be, they were begging and eager to be feed and our refusal prompted an aggressive act from them, I tell you that was my first time seeing a monkey so smart and fast, within a twinkle of an eye the monkey rush and jumped on Tamara’s body and graphed the chops from her as if that was not enough while we were walking through the walkway another monkey grabbed the full plate of small chops from Sope and ran into the bush at the moment many of us were scared including me, we couldn’t walk along on the walkway we had to peer ourselves in two.

Another interesting part of the conservation was the canopy walkway, I tell you if you are not bold or courageous or scared of height you dare not go through this part, because it is a very high walkway even higher than the trees. I can’t forget the Lawunmi, Seyifunmi and MR Ayobami who if not for Justin won’t have made it through that part because of fear. Tolu was one very courageous person I have never seen as many people were scared of the walkway, walking very slow she was just walking majestically taking selfies along side the walkway. Another side attraction while on the canopy walkway was pastor B who was at each stop point, always motivating us with songs like “I’m going higher yes higher…”

Getting down from the canopy walk we found the relaxation venue were we had lunch, dance and lot of fun, there were fish ponds like Tilapia fish pond, Kio fish pond, housing fish worth of Millions of Naira, and this fishes have many colourful skin, ludo, chess and many more were things at the relaxation venue.

And finally the day was gone, we were to go back home, while in the car waiting for others this monkeys won’t stop at anything to snatch people’s food, by taking the food of a little poor boy and the boy cried all his eyes.

You can’t grasp the full experience except you go there to see for yourself.

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