Journalism of Care

By: Lauren T. Stott | Ifsha Zehra | Tala Al-Sharif | Maya Parchment | Makenna Krist | Kourtney Dean | Camila Arostegui | Matt Marcel | Carly Haynes | Moustafa Wehbe | Hassan Ebrahim | YaRa Issa | Sara Taha

Click here to view the full website

Journalism of Care users are first directed to a lightbox display introducing our theme, logo and purpose, along with a button that invites users to explore the website and “get inspired.”

We open up the main website with our video project for a visual hook, which explains our topic in more detail and adds a human element.

Beneath the video is an elaborated introduction explaining our mission, what journalism of care is, and how to use a “toolkit,” or in other words, our series of steps to help journalists and community activists exercise journalism of care.

The first toolkit is made specifically for journalist use, and is created as a pdf document so users can easily download it. The toolkit includes the importance of caring journalism, key ways to develop care with subjects, the difference between being invasive and being immersive, a quiz to test how well you care, and a series of case studies of journalists who have exercised journalism of care.

The second toolkit is made specifically for community activist use, and is created as a pdf document so users can easily download it. The toolkit includes the importance of being a caring and engaged community member, key ways to develop care in your community, the difference between caring about something and caring for something, a quiz to test how well you care, and a series of case studies of community activists who have exercised journalism of care.

Next, we have two audio clips containing interviews expressing journalism of care examples.

Lastly, our team defines how we personally define the theme of journalism of care, and what it means to us.

Carefully considering our layout and design was a big part of our project because our theme of Journalism of Care really stresses incorporating an effective platform within its message

We wrestled with the two ideas of slow, immersive journalism…or trying to get the story carefully and following up on it, with our new generation’s short attention span and increasing desire to get the story quickly and efficiently

Because of this, we found interesting and simplified ways to display heavy, thoughtful content

You’ll notice that you don’t have to click away from the site other than the website’s ability to download pdfs. This is so we don’t lose the attention away from the user — we made it so you could just hover

These pdfs are easily downloadable so even if the user doesn’t keep the web address, they’ll be able to keep the pdf and constantly refer to it for later use

We also had to consider our audience when we created a color scheme, which includes journalists and community activists

We wanted to make the website clean and professional, so we avoided a lot of color. We also decided to make it black and white with shades of gray to illustrate the idea that the world isn’t yes or no, this or that, or black and white. There are gray areas mixed in, so we worked with them.

We chose our logo because it incorporates this new rise of cell phone journalism as well as care. Our form of journalism has the purpose of connecting the community to make a change.